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    Coin Operated Bowling Alley
    and Shuffle Alley History & Evolution

    10/21/13, cfh@provide.net
    Copyright 2001-2014, all rights reserved.

    I Collect/Buy Bowlers.
    Yes I collect bowling games by United, Chicago Coin and Bally! If you have a ball bowler for sale (particularly in the Michigan area), please contact me by email at cfh@provide.net

    Some specific bowlers I am looking for include:

    I can arrange shipping from nearly anywhere within North America. I buy ball bowlers from 1957 to 1970 ball bowlers (bowling alleys) by United, Williams and Chicago Coin Machines (Chicago Dynamics Industries, aka CDI). These are more difficult to ship, but often it is possible (please contact me if you have one for sale, and where the game is located - I am near Detroit, Michigan.)

    How to find a game easily in this document: This document is organized alphabetically by game type. To easily find a particular game, use the CTRL-F function of your browser, and type in part or all of the game's name to search this document.

    Bowler Parts and Schematics.
    Sorry I do not have any sources for other bowler parts or schematics (other than the suppliers found at the parts and repair sources web page). And I can not help find bowling games, as these things are huge (the best way to find one is to look in your local area at "amusement" type stores). Information on repair of these games can be found below and at PinRepair.com/em.

Bowling Coin-Op Introduction.
    This document covers post-WW2 and later bowling games (mostly United/Williams and Chicago Coin, but also Bally and some other brands too). There are some other styles of games here, which loosely following a bowling theme (i.e. they have a ball or a puck which is launched down an alley). This includes some Skee-Ball, Shuffle Targettes, Bouncing Ball Shuffles, and other oddities. But all games listed here basically have one thing in common; they either use a ball or a puck, which is hurled by the player down an alley.

    During the 1950s bowling was a big American past time. To capitalize on this trend, United invented (and other companies copied) coin operated versions of bowling. These games typically were not in bowling alleys (but sometimes were, for those wanting a quick game of bowling, without shoe rentals!), but were in arcades and corner bars.

    The Marriage of Seeburg, United and Williams.
    In June 1964, the Seeburg corporation (of Jukebox fame) bought the Williams Electronic Manufacturing Corporation. Seeburg operated Williams as a fully owned subsidiary, with Williams continuing its amusement machine production and maintained its distribution system. In buying Williams, Seeburg acquired all the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock from the firm's two shareholders, Samuel Stern and Bernard Weinberg.

The first shuffle alley, United's
"Shuffle-Alley", in October 1949.
(taken from a October 1949 Empire
Coin Machine
advertisement).
An add-on "disappearing pin" unit
was also available (not shown).
This device added mini-pins that
flipped up as the puck hit the
alley rollover switches.

    Only three months later (September 1964), Seeburg bought United's game assets. Sam Stern, president of Seeburg's Williams subsidiary, ran the United operation and retain his duties with Williams.

    Seeburg began its acquisition strategy in 1958 with the purchase of the Bert Mills Coffee machine. Later purchases included the Lyons cold drink machine, the Bally hot drink machine, the Pic-a-Pack utility vender, the Kinsman Organ Company, the Choice-vend and Cavalier bottle and can drink machines, the Du Grenier cigaret machine, and of course the Williams and United game lines. These acquisitions made Seeburg a full circle manufacturer of coin-operated equipment including jukeboxes, vending machines, and amusement games (pinball, bowlers, etc).

    While United has made many types of amusement machines, its bowling games and shuffle alleys have been primarily responsible for its reputation. Williams was strongest in the pinball and baseball machine lines.

    On October 31, 1964, Williams announced their move to the larger United plant at 3401 N. California avenue, Chicago. Williams still owns this plant today (where slot machines are developed, but all Williams production has been moved to a new plant in Waukegan, IL).

    Because of the marriage of United and Williams, starting about 1965 or 1966 United bowlers also have a Williams manufacturing company logo and address on "United" bowlers. Even though after September 1964 United existed in name only, Williams continued to use the "United" name because of their reputation as making the best bowling games (this information came from 1964 Billboard magazine articles). As late as the 1983, Williams was still using the United name on their Shuffle alleys (1983's Triple Strike was the last shuffle with the "United" name). Unfortunately, in 1999 Williams stopped making all amusement devices (they only make slot machines now, under the Williams name).

Chicago Coin's "lazy susan" swivel score rack that allowed the game to be serviced
from either side, without moving a game from against a rear wall. It was a great
repair idea, but the cabeinet sure was ugly! First used in 1965 on Super Sonic.

Pre-1950 Bowling Innovations.

    Prior to 1950, there were really some cool bowling games that were quite innovative. For example the 1939 Bally Alley, which used a rotating ball to do a "spin out" down the lane. This concept was later revived with the 1958 United Midget Alley.) And the first version of the "ten strike" came in 1939 with Evans (this classic was revived many times until 1971.) Another interesting pre-1950 bowler was the 1949 Keeney Ten Pins - this game took the Evans Ten Strike game one step further making it larger, and creating the first try contact ball bowler.

Why Mostly United and CCM Ball Bowling Games in this Document?
(Or What's a Good Ball Bowler to Own?)

    The reason for CCM and United bowlers is simple; I like them the best! As a friend of mine puts it (he likes Bally bowlers), it's a "Ford versus Chevy" type arguement. But I feel the quality, looks, and ease of repair is better with United and CCM bowlers. This is especially true if you are an EM pinball repair person. The mechanisms and game logic of Chicago Coin and United bowlers (and after 1964, United/Williams) will be very familar. Bally bowlers are more foreign and don't make as much sense to the typical EM pinball repair guy. Also many Bally bowlers have much of the EM modules under the lanes, making them more difficult (back pain) to work on. Note there are some exceptions to the Bally rule (like the 1963-1969 Bally Bowlers, which really rock.)

    Chicago Coin (Chicago Coin Machines or CCM, a division of Chicago Dynamics Industries aka CDI) made lots of bowling games. Generally speaking I find CCM games to be of comparible (or even better) quality to United. I like the CCM pinset units much better than United - they reset and retract with more solid motion (United pins "wooble" much more, looking cheap and toyish). This gives CCM ball bowlers a more solid look and play feel. Also the lane step-up on CCM games used four legs instead of United's two legs. This makes assembling a CCM ball bowler easier, and the game is more robust in construction. As a rule, Chicago Coin games were less expensive (retail price when new) than other makers. And hence, the quality of their electrical components was a bit lower. For example, the plastic score motor cams. These are a major problem as the cams like to crack where they attach to the score motor shaft, rendering the game useless. Finding replacements in good condition is difficult too. (But a piece of copper pipe drilled for the lock screw and put over the cracked cam works great for a repair.) Also CCM stepper units are often painted opposed to being zinc plated like United games, so rust can be an issue. But these are minor issues. United games have problems with lane warp and pin "bowties", where CCM games don't have these problems.

    As for looks, United's 1957 to 1960 games are hard to beat, and their quality is quite good, probably better than CCM. But from 1961 to 1964, I prefer CCM games for looks and play. Also CCM bowlers are feature rich, with good play action and fun options. And they were less expensive at their release, so there is a good supply of these fun playing CCM ball bowlers out there. Because of this I really like CCM ball bowlers prior to 1965. From 1965 to 1973, none of the bowlers look good! The CCM "lazy susan swivel" score rack cabinet style (used from 1965 CCM Super Sonic to their last EM ball bowler Gold Medal in 1973) and the United/Williams rectangle pinhood games (1963 United Fury to their last ball bowler in 1970) are all basically ugly with bad backglass and cabinet artwork and styling. The pre-1965 CCM games (with 1964 CCM Majestic and CCM Cadillac being the 'end of the line') are great games with nice natural oak trim, handsome looks, and feature-rich games. To me, the 1964 CCM Majestic and 1962 CCM Royal Crown are the big ball bowler for looks, play, features, and repairability. But even the 1965 to 1973 CCM bowlers are good games, maybe not as good looking, but still good games. (I have to admit, the CCM lazy susan head makes repair *way* easier than any United or Bally game.)

    Bally bowlers have a number of cosmetic features I just don't personally like as much. For example, the metal pin guard, and general look and styling of their bowlers. They just appear a bit industrial to me. Bally used cheaper hardwoods like Poplar and stained them dark, opposed to United and CCM which used nice Oak and stained it natural (or pickled white) so you could see the grain. There are also some repair issues on Bally games that are not problems on CCM or United bowlers. This includes bad connectors, bad lamp sockets, and bad fuse holders on Ballys (though fuse holders are no big deal as they are easy to replace, but the connectors and lamp sockets are more time consuming.) The lamp sockets and fuse holders can be purchased new and replaced, but it just takes time to replace them. The reason these parts were lower quality was Bally made these components in-house, instead of buying them from companies that specialized in making connectors and sockets. Because of this, Bally lamp sockets, connectors, and fuse holders will often need to be replaced, which makes restoring a Bally bowler generally more work. Finally, the EM logic Bally used for scoring with their "director unit" and mark storage relays can be a bit more difficult to troubleshoot. And many Bally bowlers have the EM modules under the lane, which can cause back pain when repairing. The upside to Bally bowlers is their speed of scoring. United and CCM games often have a "Do Not Bowl When Lit" light. This allows the games to score and cycle between frames. Bally bowlers usually do not have this as they score very fast, allowing the player to bowl as fast as the balls are returned to the player.

    Bally also had some unique ideas in bowlers, like Bally's 1964 Bally Bowler, 1965 Bally Bowler and 1966 Bally Bowler and 1969 Bally Bowler. These three games used a unique "swivel action" reciprocating pins, which allowed the pins to move in any direction (not just backwards like the linear United/CCM games). Unfortunately parts for these (often broken) pins are difficult to find, which presents a problem. But on the other hand, these Bally bowlers are probably the best all around contact ball bowler for realism. Only the 1960 United Bowlarama comes close to these Bally machines for real contact bowling.

    Another thing that contributes to the popularity of United and CCM bowlers over Bally is just the sear numbers. Bally stopped making bowlers altogether by 1969, but any Bally bowler after 1959 is pretty rare. United and CCM made bowlers into the 1970s. So there are just a lot more United and CCM bowlers out there, and parts are easier to get. Also United and CCM bowlers of the 1960s are more feature-rich with multiple games. (Bally never got into the 6-game styles that United and CCM used.)

    Types of Bowling Games.
    Essentially there are "Puck Bowlers" (aka "Shuffle Alleys") and "Ball Bowlers" (aka "Bowling Alleys"), and there are some other variant bowling games too (discussed below). Most bowlers (shuffle or ball) are six player games. United Manufacturing was the premier maker of coin operated bowling and shuffle alley games during their history. There were other companies making these games (Chicago Coin and Bally for example), but United made the bulk of them (and probably the best games too).

United "first facts"; bragging about the first shuffle alley called
"Shuffle-Alley" in October 1949.

Shuffle Alleys (aka "Puck Bowlers").

    A shuffle alley has a 4 to 9 foot long alley with bowling pins at the end of it. The player knocks down the bowling pins with essentially a metal cased hockey puck (hence the name Puck Bowler). The puck is slid down the alley and hits switches on the alley (which causes a relay to pull in, allowing the sprung bowling pins to retract upward). The puck was returned to the player by "bouncing" off a back rubber wall, and back up the alley to the player. A common thing to see with these games is "alley wax" (Sun Glo), which is not really a wax but looks like a layer of ground up corn cob. This helps the shuffle puck slide down the alley. Shuffle alleys were invented by United in October 1949 with the introduction of United's "Shuffle-Alley" (10/49). United continued to make shuffle alley all the way to the 1990s. Shuffle alleys are the less desirable of the coin operated bowling games, but most people can fit them in their basement (unlike the next type of bowler...)

United bragging about the first ball bowler call "Bowling Alley" in 1956.

Bowling Alleys (aka "Ball Bowlers").

    If you have a ball bowler for sale, please contact me at cfh@provide.net.
    The first ball bowler was introduced by United in November of 1956 ("Bowling Alley"). This game was significantly different than a shuffle alley (though it shared the same basic game rules). Chicago Coin and Bally introduced their own initial ball bowlers after United, in February 1957 ("Bowling League" and "A.B.C. Bowling Lane", respectively).

Bally's "swing away" pins, used on the 1963-1969 ball bowlers only.
This was a great idea for ball bowlers. No rollover lane switches.
The ball actually hits the pins, which in turns swivels and knocks up
the other pins, just like real bowling.

    United ball bowlers started out at a whomping 14 feet in length (typically, but 11 to 25 foot alleys were also available). Later ball bowler were available in even longer lengths, with Chicago Coin selling their later ball bowlers in lengths up to 32 feet! (With added extensions.) The alley itself was about 18 inches off the ground (later games were lower), and the player actually rolled one ball (of the usual three balls in the game) down the alley and hit bowling pins, just like real bowling.

    How long should your ball bowler be? Well if you have unlimited space, the longer the better! But most people find that a 16 foot ball bowler is about right. The shorter 13 foot models with 4.5" balls seem too short (though shorter lanes do work well with balls smaller than 4.5 inches). The longer-than-17ft lanes are great, but most people don't have the real estate to dedicate to a ball bowler that long. Hence most people like the 15 to 17 foot games with 4.5" balls and multiple game options the best.

    On 1957/1958 ball bowlers, the ball often directly hits the bottom of the bowling pins causing the spring loaded pins to move backward slightly and close a switch. This in turn activated a relay which fully retracted the hit spring-loaded pin. There are NO lane switches. This type of bowler is known as a "contact bowler", because the ball actually makes contact with the pins. But the problem with contact bowlers is the bottom of the pins wear out, causing them to not move when a ball rolls under them, and thus not scoring well. And the rubber that slows the ball after the pins often have some sort of switches to tell the game the ball is past the pins, and often these switch(es) or the rubber breaks making the game unplayable. Finally there is one or two switches for each pin located by the pin release relay (above the pins) that tell the game a pin has been hit. Because of these heavy usage switches, contact bowlers are harder to maintain and operate. Hence they were only used on a few ball (and shuffle) bowlers during 1957 and 1958. Also how the ball hits the pins and then how the pins are retracted gives a kind of "studdered" look to the pin retration. That is, the ball contact the pin moving it back about two inches. This closes a switch which tells the game to pull in the pin relay, causing the pin to then fully retract. There is a very slight delay in this process, making the pin retraction look unnatural (at least to my eye). It's not as smooth and single motioned as a lane switch bowler.

    To solve these problem the manufacturers went back to the roll-over switches in the lane (each switch connects to a relay, which when pulled in, allows the respective sprung bowling pin to retract upward). Actually hitting the pins is more realistic, but also causes more potential long term damage to the game (the pins are plastic and often broke, and the pin contact switches got beat to death). Because of this, most ball bowlers use lane switches, which are lower maintainence and just generally work better. It's a bit of an optical illussion though, as the pins are placed an inch or so behind the rollover switch, and only retact when the lane switches are closed (and not by ball impact, but it LOOKS like ball impact is making the pins retract!)

    The only true contact ball bowlers made was United Royal (11/57), Bally Lucky Alley (8/58), Bally Strike Bowler (11/57), CCM TV Bowling League (11/57), CCM Lucky Strike (1/58) and United Bowlarama/MBA (1960). Also some shuffle alleys were contact style too in 1957/1958. For the most part I don't see the big deal with contact bowlers - I actually don't mind the lane switches (there was a good reason the manufacturers did not make many contact bowler models).

    CCM actually took the lane switch/contact bowler delema a step further with their 1963 Grand series of games. These games had the pins well above the ball, and separated by a small pin deck with formica lane material on the deck. It looks a bit funky at first, but functionally it's great. First there are no visible lane rollover switches, because the switches are *under* the mini-pindeck (making them "roll-under" switches). This gave a much cleaner look to the game. It also hides the ball-pit, again giving a clean look. And since the switches are a roll-under type, beer and pretzels don't get jammed in the switches (rendering the bowler broken). And finally the ball never hits the pins, so there's no broken or dirty pins to deal with. A very good solution to the problem, but CCM only used this system for a few games in 1962-1964. The problem was the visual aspect - it's not quite what you expect a bowler's pins to look like. Hence CCM went back to a standard lane rollover switch design in 1964 with Majestic (which by the way is one of the best CCM ball bowlers, a great looking and playing game). Here's a good picture to demonstrate the two styles of pindecks (the Majestic on the left has standard lane rollover switches, and the Grand Spare Lite on the right has the hidden rollunder style switches. Other than the two different styles of lane switches, these two bowlers are identical.

    In 1963-1969 Bally used their unique "swing-away" pins, which were the best of all worlds - the ball hit the pins directly, and the pins swiveled in any direction, allowing them to hit adjacent pins. Unfortunately parts for these pins are difficult to find, and the games themselves are also very rare and not often seen. But they are among the best ball bowlers.

When buying a bowler, check for damage to the head on a bowler.
This wood covers the pins from the top. The cracks happen because
the wood is merely particle board, shaved and 'bent' to make the
round front. Eventually it will break (unless reinforced from the
back). The blue line in the picture shows another spot where the
wood pin cover can crack.

    From November 1956 to November 1957, United ball bowler models used 3" composite balls on their first four bowling alley games ('Bowling Alley', 'Team Bowling Alley', 'Hi-Score Bowling Alley', and 'Deluxe Bowling Alley'). Likewise Chicago Coin and Bally also initially used 3" balls. Interestingly, United and Bally 3" ball bowlers do not have gutters. By July of 1957, Chicago Coin's second ball bowler ('Classic Bowling League') was the first game to move to the larger 4 1/2" ball. United started using 4 1/2" balls with their November 1957 'Royal Bowling Alley'. Bally made a more gradual change by moving game to game, from a 3" ('ABC Bowling Lane'), to a 3 1/2" ('ABC Tournament'), to a 4" ('ABC Champion'), to finally a 4 1/2" ball in April 1958 for 'Trophy Bowler' and 'Lucky Alley' (8/58). But for some reason, after Lucky Alley, Bally decreased their ball size to 4" on Pan American (1/59) and Challenger (9/59). But anyway, the larger 4" or 4 1/2" balls made the games even more realistic. The added ball size allowed for more accurate throws, and seemed more like real bowling. In 1966/1967 CCM even offered two models (Vegas and Flair) with 6" balls!

A top view of the wood that covers the top side of the pins on a ball
bowler. Also shown is the pin unit. Amazingly, there are no cracked
or broken pins here! Cracked/broken pins are difficult to repair, as
replacements usually do not match the other original pins.

    The other cool thing about ball bowlers is the way a ball is returned to the player. There is an elevator style "ball lift" motor which lifts the ball up, and then rolls the ball down an incline and back to the player up the alley. About 2 feet before the ball gets to the player, the ball rolls up another incline, and comes to rest at the player's hand. This is just like a real bowling alley, in that the player does not bend over to grab the ball.

    As for styling and game play, personally I like the 1961 to 1964 games best. These games usually have multiple games ("Flash" being my favorite of the alternative-to-Regulation games) and 4.5" balls. By 1964 for United and 1965 for CCM, the games get really ugly in styling. Yes they are good playing games, but the classic looks of good backglass graphics, natural oak trim, and cabinet style/paint are gone.

A ball bowler ball hitting the pins on United's "Jumbo" ball bowler.
This was largely an optical illusion, as the ball hits lane switches
in front of the pins which electrically retracted the pins.

    For bowling fans, ball bowlers are the real deal. Of the coin operated bowling games, ball bowlers are more desirable than shuffle alleys. Unfortunately, Bally stopped making ball bowler in 1966, United in 1970, and CCM in 1973. They just took up too much floor space (even compared to shuffle alleys). There is even a rumor that in the 1960s someone tried to sue United for breaking their foot with a dropped ball bowler ball. Also ball bowlers were expensive when new (much more expensive than nearly any other coin operated device). For these reasons, 1970 (El Grande) was the end of the line for United ball bowlers (and the second to last United ball bower was Coronado in 1967, three years earlier). The other manufacturers (Chicago Coin and Bally) also stopped making ball bowlers about the same time (1973 for CCM). Solidstate ball bowlers did sparatically appear in the late 1970s, but not very many models were ever introduced during the 1970s. Chicago Coin had the last EM (Electro-Mechanical) ball bowler in 1973 called Gold Medal, which used a shorter lane length to keep locations happier (one of the complaints of ball bowlers were their size). But all the CCM ball bowlers after about 1968 were generally all the same (just with different backglass artwork). The last major manufacturer ball bowler I can find made was the late 1970's solidstate (electronic, not EM) Stern "Stars & Strikes".

A ball bowler's alley lane and ball return riser as seen by
the player. Sometimes the lane warps. Click here for
information on how to straighten a warped ball bowler lane.

Roll Down Bowlers.

    United (and later Chicago Coin) also sold a hybrid bowler that was a combination of a Shuffle Alley and a Bowling Alley. These games had a shorter overall length like a puck bowler (6 to 9.5 feet long), but used 1.5" to 3" diameter balls instead of pucks. This hybrid bowler also often used a ball lift motor to return to the ball to the player, like a ball bowler. The ball is actually just let go by the player, and it "rolls down" the tilted lane to the pins. Some of these Roll Down bowlers included Keeney Ten Pins (1949), United Pixie Bowler (9/58), United Circus (9/62), United Silver (9/62), CCM Variety (1/62). CCM's Variety and United's Circus/Silver were the longest at 9.5 and 9 feet respectively, and Pixie Bowler was 7.5 feet long. Though these game were smaller, they were not very popular (or they would have made more of this hybrid bowling game!) The rolldown games aren't really "bowling", so they didn't sell or earn as well as ball bowlers or even shuffle alleys.

    There was also another hybrid (really a predecessor) of the rolldown by United called Midget Alley (3/58). This game was unique in that it had a motor which spun a 2" composite ball at the player's end of the game. As the ball is spinning faster and faster, the player could aim the ball through a sort of moving sight. When the shot is lined up, a button is pressed releasing the ball on to the six foot alley, and the ball's spin then shot it at the pins. Midget Alley's ball release system was very unique and quite cool (and Midget Alley is a contact bowler). Another game that used this style of ball aim and release was Bally's "Bally Alley", made in the 1939 (not to be confused with the Bally Alley and Bally Lane wall games made in 1974). Bally Alley worked very similar to Midget Alley, but the pins flew to the sides instead of retracting above. Again, I am currently looking for one (please contact me at cfh@provide.net if you know of one for sale).

A "Roll Down" style bowler.

Shuffle Targettes (aka "Skee Alleys").

    The Shuffle Targette (Skee alleys) was invented by United in 1950 (Skee Alley, 11/50). The Skee Targette was a cross between a Shuffle alley and Skee-Ball (see below). The 1950 United Skee Alley, 1951 Twin Shuffle-cade Skee Alley, and 1954 Shuffle Targette Deluxe, used a small metal puck which slide down an alley toward targets at the other end. In place of bowling pins, Shuffle Targettes used a bulls-eye-style target lined with open holes. A "lip" at the end of the alley launched the puck up into the bulls-eye, earning different amounts of points depending on where the puck fell. After a set number of pucks had been played, the points were totaled. These Shuffle Targettes were a big success, and United continued to make shuffle targette games into the 1960’s. These games were made mostly in the early 1950s, and are about as collectible as Shuffle alleys.

United's first shuffle alley with score reels, the 1952 "Super Shuffle
6 Player" with it's pins revealed.

Skee-Ball History and Description.

    Skee-Balls are just like Skee Alleys, but instead of a metal puck, a small ball is used (like a Ball bowler). Skee-ball was invented in 1909 by J.D. Estes in the city of Philadelphia, and obviously predates Skee-Alleys. In 1914, Maurice Piesen marketed skee-ball to outdoor amusement parks. In 1935 the rights to Skee-Ball were purchased by the Wurlitzer Corporation from Maurice Piesen, and then Wurlitzer sold the rights to Philly Toboggan in 1945. Hence Philadelphia Toboggan Company made a lot of skee ball games from the 1945 to the present. When Skee-Ball alleys were first sold in 1914 to the outdoor amusement parks, the games had a 36-foot lane. This was too long for most arcades, so the length was changed to 14 feet. Eventually the length changed again to the modern length of 10 feet (or sometimes 13 feet). In 1974 Philladelphia Toboggan started making solidstate skeeball games. And in 1977 Skee-Ball Inc. was formed from the old Philadelphia Toboggan Company. Then in 1985 their skeeball machines now had electronic sound.

1937 Wurlitzer ad for their
Philadelphia Toboggan Skeeball game.

    Traditionally skeeball games use wooden 3" balls. Usually there are nine to eleven balls per game. Instead of knocking down bowling pins, the idea is to bowl a ball down an alley, hitting a "lip", which launched the ball into a target scoring hole. The center bulls-eye target hole is the smallest and worth the most points, and is surrounded by larger target holes worth less points (with a hole at the bottom, for a missed ball to fall).

    Skeeball certainly has its fans. In today's amusement (redemption) centers, they are a mainstream ticket-spitting game. And since skeeball has been around for so long, many people remember them at arcades when they were a kid. ICE (Buffalo NY) sells modern skeeball games like Alley Roller, ICE Ball, and Dunk n Alien. Also the old Philadelphia Toboggan is now Skee-Ball Amusement Games, and sell new versions of their classic skeeball games.

    Skee-Balls are not hugely collectible, and certainly not as collectible as Ball Bowlers. The reason? Well there's no mechanical action to them (no pins to hit and retract), so in that regard they are less desirable. But kids love them because the rules are very simple, yet the object (hitting the smallest bullseye hole) is difficult to achieve.

    During the 1950s there were the few non-Philly made skeeball games like Genco Skill Ball (1956), CCM Tournament Ski-Ball (1957), CCM Ski-Score (1957), CCM Ski-Bowl (1957) and CCM Skee-Roll (1957). Notice none of these machines use "skee ball" in the name and the scoring is a bit different, due to potential problems with Philadelphia Toboggan. United didn't make any (they stuck to the skee-alley which used a puck instead of a ball), probably because they didn't want to deal with legal hassles of using skee-balls. I personally don't like any of the Philadelphia Toboggan Company skee-ball machines, as they don't have the quality of CCM or Genco machines (but the Philly Toboggan machines are pretty easy to find), and also don't have the interesting scoring.

A row of Skee-Balls in an old arcade.

Bouncing Ball Shuffles.

    As shuffle targette games continued to do well in the arcades, in 1958 United introduced a pair of "bouncing ball" shuffle games: Jupiter and Shooting Star (Chicago Coin had its own pair of bouncing ball alleys in 1958 as well, called Rocket Shuffle and Shuffle Explorer). All four of these bouncing ball games played pretty much the same: Inside the machine’s backbox was a 5x5 grid of holes. These holes were reflected by a mirror up into the backglass. A handful of rubber balls were scattered randomly inside the head on the grid. The object of the game was to line up these balls into three, four or five in-a-row. As the shuffle puck hit spring targets at the end of the alley, the corresponding row of balls was popped up into play, landing wherever they may. Once the balls were lined up (or landed in the four corners), the player could either press a button and take the bonus points, or continue to press their luck for a better score. Collectibility of these games is somewhat limited too; most people don't even know they exist!

Bowler Games and Scoring.

    By the early 1960s, United and the other manufacturers had developed alternative bowling scoring systems. Some games had as many as seven different scoring schemes, which were user selectable at the start of a game. Probably the most innovative scoring ideas came from Chicago Coin. Some scoring systems included:
    • 30/20: Prior to 1956, nearly all bowlers used this scoring method - 30 points for a strike, 20 points for a spare. United changed to real "regulation" style scoring in 11/55 with Regulation Shuffle Alley, and most bowlers after this used regulation scoring. Electrically, the 30/20 point scoring involved less stepper units, so it is less sophisticated electrically. No frame carry-overs for strikes/spares.
    • Regulation: AKA "A.B.C. bowling rules." Regulation bowling scoring (basically all bowlers 1956 and later have this, and a select few prior to 1956 like Gottlieb Bowlette used it too). Top score 300 points. Strikes/Spares carry-over to the next frame.
    • Bonus: strikes and spares scored during the game build up to a potential "bonus" score. When the regular game ends, the play bowls an additional frame to collect the bonus. A strike earns all the bonus points, a spare gets half. Top score 9900.
    • Advance: strike and spare values are fixed but advance. Usually start out 30/20, then 60/40, then 80/60, etc. No frame carry overs for strikes/spares.
    • Progressive: strike and spare values increase (no carry overs to next frame). Basically a more advanced 30/20 scoring scheme and very similar (if not the same) as the above "Advance" scheme.
    • Special: frames 1, 4 and 7 score 300 for a strike and 200 for a spare.
    • All Strikes: on each frame, the machine presents each player with 10 pins to score. A strike is worth 300 points. Failing to get the "strike" scores only the pins hit. One shot per frame.
    • All Spares: on each frame, the machine presents each player with a random set of pins to score. The game selects from 2 to 6 pins that each player has to hit to score the spare, earning 300 points. Failing to get the "spare" scores only the pins hit. One shot per frame.
    • 300 Champ: two or more players only. Strike score 30, spare scores 20. Player continues to play as long as he continues to Strike. First player to get 300 points wins.
    • Step-Up: Fixed scoring for strikes/spares (no carry-over), but values for strikes and spares step up as game progress.
    • Add-a-Frame: After all players finish the 10th frame, players mayt shoot one, two or three added frames (as indicated on score glass). Strikes/spares are 30/20 points with no carry-over.
    • Red Dot: game "randomly" associates zero, one, two, or three "red dots" to a frame. If no dots given, a 30/20 scoring is used. If the frame gets one red dot, 50/30 scoring is used, and so on (more dots equals more points). A randomized scoring feature. No frame carry-overs for strikes/spares.
    • Flash: a traveling light on backglass/score hood registers changing values of strikes and spares. The player must time their first shot of the frame to get the most points (values range from 30/20 to 80/60). A great game of skill and timing. No carry-overs for strikes/spares.
    • Dual Flash: Same thing as Flash but if player does not get a strike, the moving flash lights start again for the second shot of the frame. No carry-overs for strikes/spares.
    • Line-Up: a type of Flash game, but incorporates a bingo grid into the flash scoring. Instead of 30/20 to 80/60 scores flashing across the pinhood, a 3x3 bingo matrix is used with single digit numbers "flashing". Player must time their shot to get the number desired. If a horizontal or vertical line is completed, the game awards extra points for 2-in-a-row or 3-in-a-row. No carry-overs.
    • Shadow: "practice bowling like the professionals". Or better put, "bowl like Stevie Wonder." As CCM explains it, "Game plays without any visible pins. Object of game is to roll ball in strike zone as the pros do in shadow bowling without pins. If strike is not made, spare light on score glass indicates where to roll second ball. Game scores regulation." If the game has pin recorder lights, these go dark too. Though this game is really strange, it is a challenge (especially trying to get spares!)

United's 1956 "Bowling Alley" ball bowler advertising bumper sticker.

Bowler Collectibility, Desirability, and Value.

    Unrestored Shuffle and Skee Alleys (shuffle targettes) tend to sell for a reasonable price ($0 to $500). The size of the games, the difficulty in repair, and the general lack of interest is to blame.

    Ball Bowlers, back in their day, were considered "top end" coin operated models. They sold new for very big money back in the 1950s and 1960s (often $700 or $800 when new), and also made the operators good money. These games were also made like tanks, and many of them have survived. Today, these games can be collectible to the right person (with a BIG walk-out basement!) After all, who doesn't want a bowling alley in their basement? But the question when selling a 11 to 24 foot Ball Bowler isn't, "how much is it worth?" The bigger question is, "who can get this non-working monster out of my basement, and haul it away?" Because of this, unrestored Ball Bowlers tend to sell for a reasonable amount ($0 to $1000).

    All Ball Bowlers and Shuffle Alleys effectively are difficult to impossible to ship, so a local buyer is often needed. This limits the price which can be asked (I am currently looking for one, so please contact me at cfh@provide.net if you know of one for sale in Michigan).

    Case in point; a gentlemen called me with a 13 foot 1958 United ball bowler. The owner's dad worked for a wiring company in the 1950s that supplied wiring harnesses to United. In the christmas of 1958, a truck pulled up to his house, and out came a brand new 1958 United Bonus Bowler (thank the United Santa Claus!) The game remained in their basement the whole time. A "home use only" ball bowler (great condition!), but the game no longer worked, and the owners were moving.

    The game needed to be removed, as the house was being sold. Also the basement was extremely small, and extraction of the bowler would be difficult. So the question to me was this; "what is the game worth?" My response was, "it doesn't really matter what the game is worth, you just need someone that is willing to take it out". And that was truely the case! Extraction of the game from the basement required three people, and took three hours! It was no small chore. The price for the game was $150. Given the work and people involved, the price paid might have been high! (The three people that moved the game complained they were sore for a week afterwards.)

    Bowler Brands/Models - Which is Best?
    The next question often asked is, "what is a 'good' bowler model?" This of course is personal preference. I personally like ball bowlers (assuming you have the 20+ feet of basement space needed!) Also I like the pre-1965 models, as those are still "wood rails" (lots of oak), and that use "big balls" (4.5" balls). The 1957/1958 models often have smaller balls, and the post-1962 models have either limited artwork, and are more complicated (difficult to repair). But the 1961 and later bowlers also have up to six different games (I like Flash bowling a lot). So it's all about compromise. Do you want more game variety (Regulation, Flash, All Strikes, etc), or classic looks and artwork? Frankly the compromise I like best are the 1961-1964 CCM ball bowlers, with the 1964 Majestic and 1963 Grand Spare Lite, and the 1962-1963 United bowlers like Holiday and Sahara being the best balance of classic looks, lots of oak, 4.5" balls, and six+ games.

    Another consideration is whether the ball/puck bowled actually hits the pins. On early United ball bowlers and most shuffle alleys, the ball or puck actually moves underneath the pins, where lane rollover switches are hit. If the ball/puck rolled over a lane switch, this engaged a relay which allowed that pin to go up (but the ball does *not* hit the pins). If the ball/puck hit a certain series of switches (perhaps the 1 and 2,3 pin switches and then a switch behind all the pins), this would register a strike, and all the pins would go up. Though this is good from a wear point of view (no broken pins!), they are not quite as realistic as a bowler where the ball/puck actually hits the pins themselves. On 1958-1960 games, United/CCM/Bally changed to a lane switch system where the ball actually hits the pins, but the lane rollover switch is what actually makes the pin retract. (Except on a couple games in 1958 where United used a "contact bowler" system to raise the pins. The pins would have a light spring which would allow the pin to move up about one inch or two. As the pin would move up from the impact of the ball, this would activate an overhead switch, which would energize a relay and raise the pin without using the force of the ball. This is a nice idea, as the reaction of the ball hitting the pin is what raises the pin, with help from the game. Also the lane was completely smooth with no proturding switches. Unfortunately this system required too much maintainence, and was changed to a lane switch style system. This is where the ball can graze the bottom of the pins, but the lane switch is what actually causes the pin to retract (and the pins should retract just before the ball hits it).

    Then there's which bowler manufacturer to pick. As discussed above, this is largely personal preference. I like United and CCM bowlers best as I feel the quality and styling is top-notch. Bally bowlers feel strange to me personally, but the 1963-1969 units are perhaps the best ball bowlers ever made.

    But no matter what style or brand of game you prefer, I'm sure you'll have fun. If you can fix one of these monsters and you have the space for it, they are quite entertaining and competitive. The ultimate party game!

Game Setup.
    The following ball bowler set up instructions came from the first United ball bowler, the 1956 "Bowling Alley" game:

    1. INSTALLATION: Fasten the four legs to the cabinet with the furnished bolts, using the painted outlines on the cabinet as a guide. Place back-box in position with furnished bolts and plug in connection jacks tight. Plug power line into AC only, 60 cycles, 115 volts. The power to this game is controlled by a toggle switch which is located under the front part of the cabinet.
    2. Place the four 3 inch diameter rubber balls into the game.
    3. In low voltage areas (105 volts or less), an additional boost in the output voltage of the transformer can be obtained by inserting the transformer voltage control fuse in the "LOW" line.
    4. To prevent abuse or cheating of this game, vibration switches are installed under the playboard and on the sides of the back box. Instructions for sensitivity are located adjacent to these switches.
    5. To make the playfield accessible for servicing, open the two locks at the left side, lift and rotate the top playfield clockwise to an upright position. The fall stop, which is part of the spring lift assembly, will lock when the board is lifted high enough. To lower the playfield, release the fall stop and reverse the procedure.
    6. To make the retractible pins accessible for servicing, remove the screw from the top of the hinged housing. This permits the opening of the hinged housing.
    7. STRIKE-CONTROL JACK: A rotary control jack is located in the cabinet which controls the "easy" and "normal" strikes. Instructions for the various adjustments are located adjacent to the jack.
    8. The back glass is mounted to a hinged frame on the back box. To unhinge the frame operate the latch located on the inside of the backbox.

Bowler Repair/Restoration Information.
    Fixing a bowler can be quite a chore, worse than any EM (electro-mechanical) pinball. Keep this in mind when purchasing a bowler. If you don't have much EM repair experience, starting with a bowler is probably not a good idea! The reason is the number of players. Practically all shuffle alleys and ball bowlers are six player games. That means 6x3=18 score reels that will need cleaned (unfrozen!) and adjusted. There are also usually at least one stepper unit per player, plus other stepper units for keeping track of frames and credits. With time, score reels and stepper units will freeze and bind because their original lubrication grease has solidified. Also there are numerous relays to clean and adjust. For an idea of the work involved, click here to see the back of a six player ball bowler. Pretty scarey stuff, eh? But if you're up for it, check out the document PinRepair.com/em for info on repairing the pre-1977 bowlers.

    Common Bowling Alley and Shuffle Alley problems:

    • Frozen score reels and stepper units.
    • Lane switches out of adjustment (common, from constant ball/puck abuse).
    • Pin up/down switches out of adjustment (common, from constant pin abuse).
    • Broken/cracked bowling pins
    • Broken pin lift solenoid plungers/links.
    • Broken/cracked pin deck cover.
    • Warped bowling lane. Click here for tips on fixing this.
    • Broken wires in the backbox. Due to the constant abuse of reseting 18 score reels and numerous stepper units, wires can break inside the wire's insulation. This is a difficult problem to diagnose and find.
    • Frozen score motor: During the 1950s, United used an enclosed score motor (unlike Gottlieb or Williams). The same grease that solidified on the score reels and stepper units is used inside the score motor! This can be a bear to fix, necessitating "splitting the case" on the score motor, and cleaning it (the case is riveted together). Sometimes 3-in-1 oil can be squirted inside the case (without "splitting the case"), on motors that are only slightly sluggish.
    • Bally Bowlers: often the fuse holders, lamp sockets, and connectors will all need to be replaced!

    Click here for a playfield switch diagram. This particular diagram is from the 1961 United "Line Up" shuffle alley. It shows each alley switch and what relay and function it performs.


The Alphabetic/Chronological Bowler Information below.
The following information is broken into three parts. The first list is United/Williams games in alphabetic order. The second list is chronological. The third list is other makers (Chicago Coin and Bally mostly).

United Bowling and Shuffle Alley Games (Alphabetic).

    Format: Game Name, Manufacturer, Date Released, additional info, picture links.

    Numbers (only games that start with actual numbers, not spelled numbers):

    • 10th Frame Manhattan Shuffle Alley, United, 9/52, Tenth Frame Manhattan, basically the same game as "10th Frame Star" shuffle alley.
    • 10th Frame Star Shuffle Alley, United, 9/52, Tenth Frame Star. Was this really the first ball bowler?
    • 10th Frame Super Shuffle Alley, United, 9/52, Tenth Frame Super, Flyer.
    • 11th Frame Shuffle Alley, United, 8/54, Eleventh Frame, Flyer.
    • 3-way Shuffle Alley, United, 11/59, Three way, 3 Way, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • 4-way Shuffle Alley, United, 11/59, Four Way, 4 Way, Flyer.
    • 5 Star Bowler (bowling alley), United, 3/61, 4.5" balls, five different games, first United ball bowler with 5 different games, last United game with "snout" style pinhood.
    • 5-way Shuffle Alley, United, 4/61, Five way, 5 Way, Flyer, BG.
    • 5 Player Shuffle Alley, United, 1/51, five players, Flyer.
    • 5th Inning, United, 6/55, Fifth Inning is a Skee Targette with a Baseball theme, Flyer.
    • 6 Star Shuffle Alley, United, 3/58, Six Star.
    • 6 Player Shuffle Alley, United, 6/51, six player, Flyer, Game.
    • 7-Stars Bowling Alley, United, 10/61, 4/5" balls, Seven Star has a pin indicator hood, 7 Stars has seven different games.

    A:

    • Ace Shuffle Alley, United, 4/54, Flyer.
    • Action Shuffle Alley, United, 7/62, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Advance Bowling Alley, United, 4/59, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, allowed selection of "Regulation" scoring (300 points max), or "Bonus" scoring (higher points for strikes, 990 points max).
    • Alamo Bowling Alley, United, 5/62, five different game modes.
    • Alley Cats Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1985, Flyer, BG, Promo Pic.
    • Alpha Shuffle Alley, United, 1968, Flyer, Game.
    • Altair Shuffle Alley, United, 1967, Flyer.
    • Amazon Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 3/66, five different scoring games.
    • Aristocrat Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1979, solidstate system3, Flyer, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Astro Shuffle Alley, United, 6/63, Flyer.
    • Astrodome Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 8/72, Flyer.
    • Atlas Shuffle Alley, United, 10/58, alternates frames between "easy strike" and "normal strike", Flyer. BG. Game.
    • Avalon Shuffle Alley, United, 4/62, BG, Game, Side.
    • Aztec Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 9/66, five different scoring games.

    B:

    • Banner Shuffle Alley, United, 6/54, Flyer.
    • Bank Pool, United, 4/64, a shuffle alley with a rack of pool balls as targets, Flyer.
    • Beta shuffle alley, United, 1969, Game.
    • Big Bonus Shuffle alley, United, 3/60, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Big Strike Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1983, a system7 SS bowler, Flyer, BG, Game, Inside.
    • Blazer Shuffle Alley, United, 6/66, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Bonus Bowling Alley, United, 6/58, 4.5" balls, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths (a 4 foot section could be added to the 13 or 16 foot base game to get 17 or 20 feet), extra shots can be won at 5th and 10th frame, ball hits pins but uses lane switches for actual pin retraction.
    • Bowl-a-Rama bowling alley, United, 10/60, 4.5" balls, Bowlarama is a very unusual looking ball bowler and the first United ball bowler with a pin indicator hood (though this style of pin hood was only used on Bowl-A-Rama), also the pins are attached using cables.
    • Bowling Alley, United, 11/56, United's first ball bowler, 3" balls, 14 foot length (only) so the flyer says (but 11 footers exist; the 14 foot version has a "man" graphic on the lane by the words "strike spare blow" and the 11 foot version has the word by no man graphic), ball does not hit pins but instead travels beneath them and hits lane switches.
    • Broadway Shuffle Alley, United, circa 1958, BG, Game.
    • Build-Up shuffle alley, United, 1950s (exact year unknown), BG, lane, side, coindoor.

    C:

    • Cameo Bowling Alley, United, 12/61, 4/5" balls, pin indicator hood, seven different games.
    • Cape Cod Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 12/72, Flyer.
    • Capitol Shuffle Alley, United, 8/55, Flyer.
    • Capri Bowling Alley, United, 6/63.
    • Caravelle Shuffle Alley, United, 2/63, BG, Game, Game.
    • Cascade Shuffle Alley, United, 6/53, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Casino Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1978, Flyer.
    • Cavalier Shuffle Alley, United, 12/76, Flyer.
    • Cheetah Shuffle Alley, United, 3/65.
    • Century Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 9/68, 13/16 foot lengths (additional 4 and 8 foot sections available), 5 games.
    • Centenial Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 1968, the same game as Century with minor artwork changes.
    • Cherokee Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 6/77, Flyer.
    • Chief Shuffle Alley, United, 11/53, Game, Game.
    • Cimarron Shuffle Alley, United, 1971, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Circus, United, 9/62, roll down bowler, 7 games, six players, 9 feet long, 3" balls.
    • Civic Center shuffle alley, United, 9/74, BG, Game, Game.
    • Classic Shuffle Alley, United, 8/53, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Classic Deluxe Bowling Alley, United, mid 1961, 4.5" balls, first game with modern pin indicator hood (and alley width increases one inch because the gutters go from 4" wide to 4.5" wide to accomodate larger pinhood), five different games.
    • Clipper Shuffle Alley, United, 5/55, came both Deluxe and 'regular' versions, Flyer, BG (reg), BG (dlx), Game.
    • Clover Shuffle Alley, United, 6/53, Flyer, BG, Head.
    • Comet Shuffle Targette, United, 10/54, Game, BG, target, cab, cab.
    • Coronado Bowling Alley, United, 6/67, five different scoring games.
    • Corral Shuffle Alley, United, 10/65, BG, Game.
    • Crest Shuffle Alley, United, 4/63, six games, Game, Game.
    • Crystal Shuffle Alley, United, 1/62, Flyer.
    • Cupper Shuffle Alley, United, 1955, Game.
    • Cyclone Shuffle Alley, United, 12/58, Flyer.
    • Cypress Bowling Alley, United, 12/62.

    D:

    • Delta Shuffle Alley, United, 1968, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Deluxe 6 Player Shuffle Alley, United, 10/51, last United bowler with light scoring, six players, Flyer.
    • Deluxe Bowler (shuffle alley), Williams, 1/50, #35, BG, Lane, Side.
    • Deluxe Bowling Alley, United, 10/57, 3" balls.
    • Derby Roll (roll down), United, 5/55, a ball is rolled down the alley into the desired hole, running horse unit in backbox with moving mechanical horses, Flyer, Game.
    • Dixie Bowling Alley, United, 2/61, 4.5" balls, two different games (regulation and line-up).
    • Dolphin Shuffle Alley, United, 7/61, Flyer.
    • Double Shuffle Alley, United, 3/50, two players, Flyer, BG, Pins, Game.
    • Dual Shuffle Alley, United, 4/59, Flyer.
    • Duck Pin Bowling, United, circa 1956 (exact date unknown), perhaps United's first ball bowler? Two players, uses 8.5" pins and 4" balls (not 3" and not 4.5"). Ball return is on an external ball guide.
    • Duplex Bowling Alley, United, 11/58, 4.5" balls, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, first United ball bowler with two scoring schemes ("Regulation" with 300 points max, or "Progressive" with 990 points max).

    E:

    • Eagle Shuffle Alley, United, 6/58, Flyer.
    • El Grande bowling alley, United/Williams, 3/70, six games, the last ball bowler by United.
    • Embassy Shuffle Alley, United, 9/62, Flyer.
    • Emerald Shuffle Alley, United, 10/76, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Empire Shuffle Alley, United, 6/59, BG.
    • Encore Shuffle Alley, United, 10/66, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Epsilon Shuffle Alley, United, 1969, Flyer, BG.

    F:

    G:

    • Galleon Bowling Alley, United, 3/65, pointy artwork.
    • Gamma Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1968, BG, Game, Flyer.
    • Gateway Arch Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 5/72, Flyer.
    • Gold Mine Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1988, Flyer, Game.
    • Golden Triangle Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 4/74, Flyer, BG.
    • Granite Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 6/74, Flyer.
    • Gypsy Shuffle Alley, United, 12/61, Game.

    H:

    • Handicap Shuffle Alley, United, 9/56, Flyer. BG, Game.
    • Handicap Bowling Alley, United, 10/59, 4.5" balls, allowed individual or team scoring, gave player choice of easy/medium/hard strike feature (changed the lane switch combination required to obtain a strike).
    • Hi-Score Bowling Alley, United, 8/57, 3" balls, 11 or 14 foot lengths (a 4 foot section could be added to 14 foot base game to get 18 feet), ball does not hit pins but instead travels beneath them and hits lane switches.
    • Holiday Bowling Alley, United, 2/62.

    I:

    J:

    • Jill-Jill Shuffle Alley, United, 11/63, novelty (NY only).
    • Jumbo Bowling Alley, United, 12/57, 4.5" balls, ball hits pins but uses lane switches for actual pin retraction, Jumbo is exactly the same as Royal except Royal is a contact bowler and Jumbo is not.
    • Jupiter Bouncing Ball Shuffle Alley, United, 9/58, Flyer.

    K:

    • Kick-a-Poo, United, 9/65, a shuffle targette.
    • Kick-a-Poo II, United, 1985, a shuffle targette, prototype only.
    • King Tut Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 8/79, solidstate, Flyer, Flyer, Game, Inside.

    L:

    • Laguna Shuffle Alley, United, 1970. Flyer, Game, BG.
    • Lancer Shuffle Alley, United, 11/62, fluorescent BG lighting, white on black score reels, seven player selectable games, Flyer, BG.
    • Las Vegas, United/Williams, 1/73.
    • Leader Shuffle Alley, United, 11/53, BG, BG, Game, Game, Game.
    • League Shuffle Alley, United, 1/54, Flyer.
    • League Bowling Alley, United, 9/59, 4.5" balls, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, allowed two or three player teams to compete and kept team scores (or six individual players).
    • League Champ Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1996, dot matrix score display, Flyer.
    • Liberty Shuffle Alley, United, 1952, BG, Game, Game.
    • Liberty Bell Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 9/71, Flyer, Game.
    • Line Up Shuffle Alley, United, 12/60, Flyer, BG.
    • Lightning Shuffle Alley, United, 3/55, Flyer, Game.
    • Lucky Bowling Alley, United, 11/62, fluorescent BG lighting, larger white on black score reels, seven player selectable games.

    M:

    • Mambo Shuffle Alley, United, 12/64.
    • Manhattan Shuffle Alley, United, 1953, BG, Game.
    • Matador Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 12/64.
    • Marquis Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 6/75, Flyer, Game, BG.
    • Mars Deluxe Shuffle Alley, United, 12/54, Flyer.
    • Maverick Bowling Alley, United, 11/65.
    • MBA Bowling Alley, MBA/United, 1960, six player, not actually by United by all hardware is United EM parts, much like United's Bowl-a-rama with pins attached to cables.
    • Mercury Deluxe Shuffle Alley, United, 10/54, Flyer.
    • Midget Alley, United, 3/58, a spin and release style roll down bowler with moving sights, uses two 2" balls, 6 foot long, two players, no lane switches (ball hits pins and uses overhead pin feedback switches instead).
    • Mini Bowl, Williams, 8/70, #379, manikin bowler, reissue of Ten Strike/Ten Pins (12/57).

    N:

    • Niagra Shuffle Alley, United, 12/58, Flyer.
    • Nugget Shuffle Alley, United, 10/77, Flyer.

    O:

    P:

    • Pacer Shuffley Alley, United, 4/64.
    • Palos Verde Shuffle Alley, United, 1970, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Pegasus Shuffle Alley, United, 1968.
    • Pinnacle Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 2/74, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Pixie Bowler, United, 9/58, roll down bowler, 1.5" balls, 7.5 foot long, two players.
    • Playboy, United, 10/61, six players, a shuffle alley skee-ball type game.
    • Play Mate Shuffle Table, United, 1/59, PlayMate has a turn around shuffle layout.
    • Playtime Bowling Alley, United, 11/58, 4.5" balls, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, "easy strike" and "normal strike" feature (changed the lane switch combination required to obtain a strike).
    • Pompeii Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1978, solidstate, Flyer, BG, Game, Game.
    • Polaris bowling alley, United/Williams, 8/64.
    • Pool Alley, United, 6/56, two players, a mix of pool and bowling, a que-ball is launched at bowling pins (with a pool cue), ball drains behind pins and roll through the cabinet and returned to player at coin door area, storage bin to left of coin door for pool cues, Flyer, BG, Alley.
    • Premier Barrel Roll Skeeball, Premier, 1930s, has a turning wooden barrel in the backboard that the player tries to get the ball through for extra points, 10 1/2 feet long x 25 inches wide x 66 inches tall BG, Lane, Game, CoinDoor, Lane.
    • Prize Bowler (shuffle alley), United, 1951, one player, first United bowler with score reels, Backglass, Side, Back.
    • Pyramid Shuffle Alley, United, 6/65.

    R:

    • Rainbow Shuffle Alley, United, 4/54, Flyer.
    • Regal Bowling Alley, United, 4/63.
    • Regulation Shuffle Alley, United, 11/55, first United game with Regulation scoring. Flyer.
    • Regulation Shuffle Alley 6 Star, United, 10/57, Flyer.
    • Royal Bowling Alley, United, 11/57, first United ball bowler with 4.5" balls, Contact bowler, 13 or 16 foot lengths (a 4 foot section could be added between sections of the 13 or 16 foot base game yielding 17 or 20 feet), no lane switches (ball hits pins and uses overhead pin feedback switches instead).
    • Royal Hawaiian Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 10/73, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Royal Shuffle Alley, United, 8/53, Flyer, BG, Game, Game.
    • Rumpus, United, 5/63, a shuffle targette.

    S:

    • Saber Bowling Alley, United, 2/63, fluorescent BG lighting, white on black score reels.
    • Sahara Bowling Alley, United, 7/62.
    • Savoy Bowling Alley, United, 7/60, 4.5" balls.
    • Select Play Shuffle Alley, United, 6/56, Flyer.
    • Seville Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 6/76, BG, Game.
    • Shooting Star Bouncing Ball Shuffle Alley, United, 5/58, Flyer, Flyer, Game.
    • Shuffle-Alley, United, 10/49, the first shuffle alley ever made, one player, has stationary small light-up bowling pins above lane. The puck on this game does *not* bounce back to the player after a shot. Instead the back drains out the game, and is returned to the player at the front coin door area of the game via a belt (when the game is over, the puck is kept inside the game). Essentially this game is just like Gottlieb's 1950 Bowlette game in function, operation and scoring (but Bowlette is considerably smaller and more desirable). Also a "disappearing pin" add-on was available which replaced the stationary pins with pins that retracted (disappeared) as the puck moved over the lane's rollover switches. Flyer, Backglass, Game (without the "disappear pins" add-on), Game (with the "disappear pins" add-on), BG/Pins (with the "disappear pins" add-on), Coin door and Puck (wood underneath puck was added later). Some pictures by D.Caldwell.
    • Shuffle Alley, United, 3/52, six players, BG, Game.
    • Shuffle Alley Deluxe, United, 9/50, one player, actually an upgrade kit for United's 10/49 Shuffle Alley to add disappearing pins, Flyer.
    • Shuffle Alley Express, United, 6/50, one player, an upgraded United 10/49 Shuffle Alley with disappearing pins, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Shuffle Baseball, United, 6/62, a shuffle targette with baseball scoring. Try to score as many bonus points and runs as possible. Bonus points are the total bases plus the runs, and they will be added up after each shuffle of the puck. For example, if on your first shot you got a HR, you would get 4 for total bases and 1 for the run, so your total points would be 5. If on the next shot, you got a double, you would get 6 (4 scored previously + 2 for your double) plus the 1 run you already have, for a total of 12 (5 after the first shuffle, and 7 more after the second shuffle). So in essence, you add up your total bases plus runs scored after each shuffle to get the total points. It really starts adding up after awhile. Runs are scored as in regular baseball. You do not make any outs, only 'S' for single, 'D' for double, 'T' for triple, and 'HR' for a home run. If you miss the target area completely, you get no extra bonus, but lose a shot. Usually set for 20 shots per game The puck is returned on a conveyer belt. BG, BG, target.
    • Shuffle Bowler, United, 12/49, one player.
    • Shuffle Inn Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1989, Flyer, Flyer.
    • Shuffle Play-Mate, United, 1950s (exact date unknown), Flyer.
    • Shuffle Targette Deluxe, United, 8/54, a puck shuffle into skee-ball type targets, Flyer, BG, Game, Game.
    • Silver, United, 6/62, a rolldown ball bowler type game in a shuffle alley size cabinet, 5 games. Very similar to United Circus (1962).
    • Simplex Bowling Alley, United, 8/59, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, ONE player (most ball bowlers are six player), light animated backglass showing pins left.
    • Skee Alley, United, 11/50, one player, United's first Shuffle Targette (skee ball but with a puck), Flyer, BG, Side, Game.
    • Skee-Ball-Ette, Gottlieb, 1940, one player, skee ball style manikin game.
    • Skippy Shuffle Alley, United, 11/63.
    • Slugger Shuffle Alley, United, 7/50, two players, Flyer.
    • Sparky Shuffle Alley, United, 12/62, Flyer, Game.
    • Speedy Shuffle Alley, United, 6/54, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Star Sapphire Shuffle Alley, United, 1/76, Flyer.
    • Star Shuffle Alley, United, 2/53, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Stardust shuffle alley, United, 9/61, flyer.
    • Strike Master Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1991, dot matrix score display, last shuffle alley made by Williams/United, Flyer, Flyer, BG, Pins, Game.
    • Strike Zone, Williams, 1984, Flyer, Flyer, Flyer.
    • Sunny Shuffle Alley, United, 4/60, Flyer, game, BG, BG.
    • Super Bonus Shuffle Alley (Deluxe Super Bonus), United, 10/55, Flyer.
    • Super Shuffle Alley 6 Player, United, 3/52, first United bowler with score reels, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Super Shuffle Alley, United, 2/50, one player, lighted pins that do not move, Flyer, Game, Alley.
    • Supreme Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 2/75, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Sure Fire Shuffle Alley, United, 7/60, flyer.

    T:

    • Tango Shuffle Alley, United, 2/66.
    • Taurus Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1979, Flyer.
    • Team Bowling Alley, United, 4/57, four 3" balls, no gutters. United's second ball bowler - basically it's the same game as their first ball bowler "Bowling Alley" (11/56), but has two additional sets of score reels for accumulated team scoring. Length is 11 or 14 foot lengths (a 4 foot section could be added to a 14 foot base game to get 18 feet). Ball does not hit pins but instead travels beneath them and hits lane switches.
    • Team-Mate Bowling Alley, United, 12/59, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, 4.5" balls, player choice of Regulation (300 point max) or Progressive (990 point max) scoring games.
    • Team Shuffle Alley, United, 3/54, Flyer.
    • Tempest Shuffle Alley, United, 3/64, Flyer.
    • Ten Strike, Williams, 12/57, two players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, match feature, replay version of Ten Pins (12/57), reissed in 1970 as Mini Bowl.
    • Ten Strike 6 Player, Williams, 12/57, six players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, a six player version. Available only in 7 foot ("jumbo") playfield length.
    • Ten Pins, Williams, 12/57, two players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, no match (novelty), reissed in 1970 as Mini Bowl.
    • Thunder bowling alley, United, 6/64.
    • Thunderbird Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1977, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Tic Tac Strike, Williams, 1986, Flyer, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Tiger Shuffle Alley, United, 7/64, BG, Game.
    • Times Square Shuffle Alley, United, 3/71, Flyer.
    • Tip Top Bowling Alley, United, 1/61, 4.5" balls.
    • Top Dawg Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1988, Flyer, BG, BG, Game.
    • Top Hat (shuffle alley), United, 1951, six players, Game, Game.
    • Top Notch Shuffle Alley, United, 10/55, Flyer.
    • Topaz Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1978, first solidstate United bowler, Flyer, BG.
    • Topper Shuffle Alley, United, 2/62, Flyer.
    • Tornado Bowling Alley, United, 4/64.
    • Triple Strike Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1983, the last "United" shuffle alley, Flyer, Flyer.
    • Tropics Bowling Alley, United, 1962, lengths from 13, 16, 17, 20 and 24 feet.
    • Twin Cities Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 8/73, Flyer.
    • Twin Shuffle Alley Rebound, United, 7/50, two players, BG.
    • Twin Shuffle-cade Skee Alley, United, 3/51, two players, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Two Player Shuffle Alley Express, United, 1951, two players, BG, Game.

    U:

    • Ultra Shuffle Alley, United, 8/63.
    • Unique Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 11/74, Flyer.

    V:

    W:

    • Windy City Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1/72, Flyer.

    Y:

    • Yankee Shuffle Alley, United, 5/54, BG, Game.

    Z:

    • Zenith Shuffle Alley, United, 4/59, Flyer.


United Bowling and Shuffle Alleys (Chronological).
    Format: YEAR, Game Name, Manufacturer, Date, additional info, picture links.

    Pre-WW2:

    • Premier Barrel Roll Skeeball, Premier, 1930s, has a turning wooden barrel in the backboard that the player tries to get the ball through for extra points, 10 1/2 feet long x 25 inches wide x 66 inches tall BG, Lane, Game, CoinDoor, Lane.

    1949:

    • Shuffle-Alley, United, 10/49, the first shuffle alley ever made, one player, has stationary small light-up bowling pins above lane. The puck on this game does *not* bounce back to the player after a shot. Instead the back drains out the game, and is returned to the player at the front coin door area of the game via a belt (when the game is over, the puck is kept inside the game). Essentially this game is just like Gottlieb's 1950 Bowlette game in function, operation and scoring (but Bowlette is considerably smaller and more desirable). Also a "disappearing pin" add-on was available which replaced the stationary pins with pins that retracted (disappeared) as the puck moved over the lane's rollover switches. Flyer, Backglass, Game (without the "disappear pins" add-on), Game (with the "disappear pins" add-on), BG/Pins (with the "disappear pins" add-on), Coin door and Puck (wood underneath puck was added later). Some pictures by D.Caldwell.
    • Shuffle Bowler, United, 12/49, one player.

    1950:

    • Deluxe Bowler (shuffle alley), Williams, 1/50, #35, BG, Lane, Side.
    • Super Shuffle Alley, United, 2/50, one player, lighted pins that do not move, Flyer, Game, Alley.
    • Shuffle Alley Express, United, 6/50, one player, an upgraded United 10/49 Shuffle Alley with disappearing pins, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Double Shuffle Alley, United, 3/50, two players, Flyer, BG, Pins, Game.
    • Slugger Shuffle Alley, United, 7/50, two players, Flyer.
    • Twin Shuffle Alley Rebound, United, 7/50, two players, BG.
    • Shuffle Alley Deluxe, United, 9/50, one player, actually an upgrade kit for United's 10/49 Shuffle Alley to add disappearing pins, Flyer.
    • Skee Alley, United, 11/50, one player, United's first Shuffle Targette (skee ball but with a puck), Flyer.

    1951:

    • Top Hat (shuffle alley), United, 1951, six players, Game, Game.
    • Two Player Shuffle Alley Express, United, 1951, two players, BG, Game.
    • 5 Player Shuffle Alley, United, 1/51, 5 players, Flyer.
    • Twin Shuffle-cade Skee Alley, United, 3/51, two players, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • 6 Player Shuffle Alley, United, 6/51, six players, lightbox scoring (no score reels), Flyer, Game.
    • Deluxe 6 Player Shuffle Alley, United, 10/51, last United bowler with light scoring, six players, lightbox scoring (no score reels), Flyer.
    • Prize Bowler (shuffle alley), United, 1951, one player, first United bowler with score reels, Backglass, Side, Back.

    All Bowlers from here on are six player games with score reels.

    1952:

    • Super Shuffle Alley 6 Player, United, 3/52, first United bowler with score reels, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Shuffle Alley, United, 3/52, six players, BG, Game.
    • Alamo Bowling Alley, United, 5/62, line-up, regulation and bonus bowling modes.
    • Official Shuffle Alley, United, 6/52, 4 players, Flyer.
    • 10th Frame Manhattan Shuffle Alley, United, 9/52, basically the same game as "10th Frame Star" shuffle alley.
    • 10th Frame Star Shuffle Alley, United, 9/52, Tenth Frame Star. Was this really the first ball bowler?
    • Fireball Alley, United, 1952, six player shuffle alley, similar to 10th Frame Star Shuffle (10/52), BG, Game.
    • 10th Frame Super Shuffle Alley, United, 9/52, Flyer.
    • Liberty Shuffle Alley, United, 1952, BG, Game, Game.

    1953:

    • Manhattan Shuffle Alley, United, 1953, BG, Game.
    • Star Shuffle Alley, United, 2/53, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Cascade Shuffle Alley, United, 6/53, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Clover Shuffle Alley, United, 6/53, Flyer, BG, Head.
    • Classic Shuffle Alley, United, 8/53, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Olympic Shuffle Alley, United, 8/53, Flyer, BG, Cab.
    • Royal Shuffle Alley, United, 8/53, Flyer.
    • Imperial Shuffle Alley, United, 11/53, Flyer, BG, Game, Game.
    • Chief Shuffle Alley, United, 11/53, Game, Game.
    • Leader Shuffle Alley, United, 11/53, BG, BG, Game, Game, Game.

    1954:

    • League Shuffle Alley, United, 1/54, Flyer.
    • Team Shuffle Alley, United, 3/54, Flyer.
    • Ace Shuffle Alley, United, 4/54, Flyer.
    • Rainbow Shuffle Alley, United, 4/54, Flyer.
    • Yankee Shuffle Alley, United, 5/54, BG, Game.
    • Banner Shuffle Alley, United, 6/54, Flyer.
    • Speedy Shuffle Alley, United, 6/54, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • 11th Frame Shuffle Alley, United, 8/54, Flyer.
    • Shuffle Targette Deluxe, United, 8/54, a puck shuffle into skee-ball type targets, Flyer, BG, Game, Game.
    • Comet Shuffle Targette, United, 10/54, Game, BG, target, cab, cab.
    • Mercury Deluxe Shuffle Alley, United, 10/54, Flyer.
    • Mars Deluxe Shuffle Alley, United, 12/54, Flyer.

    1955:

    • Cupper Shuffle Alley, United, 1955, Game.
    • Lightning Shuffle Alley, United, 3/55, Flyer, Game.
    • Clipper Shuffle Alley, United, 5/55, came both Deluxe and 'regular' versions, Flyer, BG (reg), BG (dlx), Game.
    • Derby Roll (roll down), United, 5/55, a ball is rolled down the alley into the desired hole, running horse unit in backbox with moving mechanical horses, Flyer, Game.
    • Venus Shuffle Targette Skee Alley, United, 5/55, Flyer.
    • 5th Inning, United, 6/55, a Skee Targette with a Baseball theme, Flyer.
    • Capitol Shuffle Alley, United, 8/55, Flyer.
    • Super Bonus Shuffle Alley (Deluxe Super Bonus), United, 10/55, Flyer.
    • Top Notch Shuffle Alley, United, 10/55, Flyer.
    • Regulation Shuffle Alley, United, 11/55, first United game with Regulation scoring. Flyer.
    • Vogue Shuffle Targette Skee Alley, United, circa 1955.

    Most Bowlers after this point used Regulation scoring instead of 20/30 scoring. The 20/30 scoring method was largely abandoned.

    1956:

    • Duck Pin Bowling, United, circa 1956 (exact date unknown), perhaps United's first ball bowler? Two players, uses 8.5" pins and 4" balls (not 3" and not 4.5"). Ball return is on an external ball guide.
    • Pool Alley, United, 6/56, two players, a mix of pool and bowling, a que-ball is launched at bowling pins (with a pool cue), ball drains behind pins and roll through the cabinet and returned to player at coin door area, storage bin to left of coin door for pool cues, Flyer, BG, Alley.
    • Select Play Shuffle Alley, United, 6/56, Flyer.
    • Handicap Shuffle Alley, United, 9/56, Flyer.
    • Bowling Alley, United, 11/56, United's first ball bowler, 3" balls, 14 foot length (only) so the flyer says (but 11 footers exist; the 14 foot version has a "man" graphic on the lane by the words "strike spare blow" and the 11 foot version has the word by no man graphic), ball does not hit pins but instead travels beneath them and hits lane switches.

    1957:

    • Team Bowling Alley, United, 4/57, four 3" balls, no gutters. United's second ball bowler - basically it's the same game as their first ball bowler "Bowling Alley" (11/56), but has two additional sets of score reels for accumulated team scoring. Length is 11 or 14 foot lengths (a 4 foot section could be added to a 14 foot base game to get 18 feet). Ball does not hit pins but instead travels beneath them and hits lane switches.
    • Hi-Score Bowling Alley, United, 8/57, 3" balls, 11 or 14 foot lengths (a 4 foot section could be added to 14 foot base game to get 18 feet), ball does not hit pins but instead travels beneath them and hits lane switches.
    • Deluxe Bowling Alley, United, 10/57, 3" balls.
    • Regulation Shuffle Alley 6 Star, United, 10/57, Flyer.

    • Royal Bowling Alley, United, 11/57, first United ball bowler with 4.5" balls and slim lane configuration, Contact bowler, 13 or 16 foot lengths (a 4 foot section could be added between sections of the 13 or 16 foot base game yielding 17 or 20 feet), no lane switches (ball hits pins and uses overhead pin feedback switches instead).
    • Jumbo Bowling Alley, United, 12/57, 4.5" balls, ball hits pins but uses lane switches for actual pin retraction, Jumbo is exactly the same as Royal except Royal is a contact bowler and Jumbo is not.
    • Ten Strike, Williams, 12/57, two players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, match feature, replay version of Ten Pins (12/57), reissed in 1970 as Mini Bowl.
    • Ten Strike 6 Player, Williams, 12/57, six players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, a six player version. Available only in 7 foot ("jumbo") playfield length.
    • Ten Pins, Williams, 12/57, two players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, no match (novelty), reissed in 1970 as Mini Bowl.

    1958:

    • Broadway Shuffle Alley, United, circa 1958, BG, Game.
    • Midget Alley, United, 3/58, a spin and release style roll down bowler with moving sights, uses two 2" balls, 6 foot long, two players, no lane switches (ball hits pins and uses overhead pin feedback switches instead).
    • 6 Star Shuffle Alley, United, 3/58.
    • Shooting Star Bouncing Ball Shuffle Alley, United, 5/58, Flyer, Flyer, Game.
    • Bonus Bowling Alley, United, 6/58, 4.5" balls, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths (a 4 foot section could be added to the 13 or 16 foot base game to get 17 or 20 feet), extra shots can be won at 5th and 10th frame, ball hits pins but uses lane switches for actual pin retraction.
    • Eagle Shuffle Alley, United, 6/58, Flyer.
    • Jupiter Bouncing Ball Shuffle Alley, United, 9/58, Flyer.
    • Pixie Bowler (roll down), United, 9/58, roll down bowler, 1.5" balls, 7.5 foot long, two players.
    • Atlas Shuffle Alley, United, 10/58, alternates frames between "easy strike" and "normal strike", Flyer. BG. Game.
    • Duplex Bowling Alley, United, 11/58, 4.5" balls, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, first United ball bowler with two scoring schemes ("Regulation" with 300 points max, or "Progressive" with 990 points max).
    • Playtime Bowling Alley, United, 11/58, 4.5" balls, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, "easy strike" and "normal strike" feature (changed the lane switch combination required to obtain a strike).
    • Cyclone Shuffle Alley, United, 12/58, Flyer.
    • Niagra Shuffle Alley, United, 12/58, Flyer.

    1959:

    • Play Mate Shuffle Table, United, 1/59, PlayMate has a turn around shuffle layout. Flyer.
    • Advance Bowling Alley, United, 4/59, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, allowed selection of "Regulation" scoring (300 points max), or "Bonus" scoring (higher points for strikes, 990 points max).
    • Dual Shuffle Alley, United, 4/59, Flyer.
    • Zenith Shuffle Alley, United, 4/59, Flyer.
    • Empire Shuffle Alley, United, 6/59, BG.
    • Flash Shuffle Alley, United, 6/59, Flyer.
    • Simplex Bowling Alley, United, 8/59, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, ONE player (most ball bowlers are six player), light animated backglass showing pins left.
    • League Bowling Alley, United, 9/59, 4.5" balls, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, allowed two or three player teams to compete and kept team scores (or six individual players).
    • Handicap Bowling Alley, United, 10/59, 4.5" balls, allowed individual or team scoring, gave player choice of easy/medium/hard strike feature (changed the lane switch combination required to obtain a strike).
    • 3-way Shuffle Alley, United, 11/59, Flyer.
    • 4-way Shuffle Alley, United, 11/59, Flyer.
    • Team-Mate Bowling Alley, United, 12/59, 13/16/17/20 foot lengths, 4.5" balls, player choice of Regulation (300 point max) or Progressive (990 point max) scoring games.

    1960:

    • Big Bonus Shuffle Alley, United, 3/60, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Falcon Bowling Alley, United, 3/60.
    • Official Jumbo Bowler, United, 3/60.
    • Sunny Shuffle Alley, United, 4/60, Flyer, game, BG, BG.
    • Sure Fire Shuffle Alley, United, 7/60, flyer.
    • Bowl-a-Rama bowling alley, United, 10/60, 4.5" balls, Bowlarama is a very unusual looking ball bowler and the first United ball bowler with a pin indicator hood (though this style of pin hood was only used on Bowl-A-Rama), also the pins are attached using cables.MBA Bowling Alley, MBA/United, 1960, six player, not actually by United by all hardware is United EM parts, much like United's Bowl-a-rama with pins attached to cables.
    • Savoy Bowling Alley, United, 7/60, 4.5" balls.
    • Line Up Shuffle Alley, United, 12/60, Flyer, BG.

    After 1960, no More 1950s-ish Girls on United Bowler Backglasses.
    Because United games got more complex, there was less backglass real estate available, so the girls were gone! Drat.

    1961:

    • Viking Shuffle Alley, United, 1961, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Tip Top Bowling Alley, United, 1/61, 4.5" balls.
    • Dixie Bowling Alley, United, 2/61, 4.5" balls, two different games (regulation and line-up).
    • 5 Star Bowler (bowling alley), United, 3/61, 4.5" balls, five different games, first United ball bowler with 5 different games, last United game with "snout" style pinhood.
    • 5-way Shuffle Alley, United, 4/61, Flyer, BG.

    • Classic Deluxe Bowling Alley, United, mid 1961, 4.5" balls, first game with modern pin indicator hood (and alley width increases one inch because the gutters go from 4" wide to 4.5" wide to accomodate larger pinhood), five different games.
    • Frolics Deluxe Bowling Alley, United, mid 1961, 4.5" balls, pin indicator hood, first United game with "flash" game, six different games.
    • Dolphin Shuffle Alley, United, 7/61, Flyer.
    • Stardust shuffle alley, United, 9/61, flyer.
    • 7-Stars Bowling Alley, United, 10/61, 4/5" balls, Seven Star has a pin indicator hood, 7 Stars has seven different games.
    • Playboy, United, 10/61, six players, a shuffle alley skee-ball type game.
    • Cameo Bowling Alley, United, 12/61, 4/5" balls, pin indicator hood, seven diferent games.
    • Gypsy Shuffle Alley, United, 12/61, Game.

    1962:

    • Tropics Bowling Alley, United, 1962, lengths from 13, 16, 17, 20 and 24 feet.
    • Crystal Shuffle Alley, United, 1/62, Flyer.
    • Holiday Bowling Alley, United, 2/62.
    • Topper Shuffle Alley, United, 2/62, Flyer.
    • Avalon Shuffle Alley, United, 4/62, BG, Game, Side.
    • Alamo Bowling Alley, United, 5/62, five different game modes.
    • Silver, United, 6/62, a rolldown ball bowler type game in a shuffle alley size cabinet, 5 games. Very similar to United Circus (1962).
    • Shuffle Baseball, United, 6/62, a shuffle targette with baseball scoring. Try to score as many bonus points and runs as possible. Bonus points are the total bases plus the runs, and they will be added up after each shuffle of the puck. For example, if on your first shot you got a HR, you would get 4 for total bases and 1 for the run, so your total points would be 5. If on the next shot, you got a double, you would get 6 (4 scored previously + 2 for your double) plus the 1 run you already have, for a total of 12 (5 after the first shuffle, and 7 more after the second shuffle). So in essence, you add up your total bases plus runs scored after each shuffle to get the total points. It really starts adding up after awhile. Runs are scored as in regular baseball. You do not make any outs, only 'S' for single, 'D' for double, 'T' for triple, and 'HR' for a home run. If you miss the target area completely, you get no extra bonus, but lose a shot. Usually set for 20 shots per game The puck is returned on a conveyer belt. BG, BG, target.
    • Action Shuffle Alley, United, 7/62, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Circus, United, 9/62, roll down bowler, 7 games, six players, 9 feet long, 3" balls.
    • Sahara Bowling Alley, United, 7/62.
    • Embassy Shuffle Alley, United, 9/62, Flyer.
    • Lancer Shuffle Alley, United, 11/62, fluorescent BG lighting, white on black score reels, seven player selectable games, Flyer, BG.
    • Lucky Bowling Alley, United, 11/62, fluorescent BG lighting, larger white on black score reels, seven player selectable games.
    • Cypress Bowling Alley, United, 12/62.
    • Sparky Shuffle Alley, United, 12/62, Flyer, Game.

    1963:

    • Crest Shuffle Alley, United, 4/63, Game.
    • Caravelle Shuffle Alley, United, 2/63, BG, Game, Game.
    • Sabre Bowling Alley, United, 2/63, fluorescent BG lighting, larger white on black score reels, LED display.
    • Regal Bowling Alley, United, 4/63.
    • Astro Shuffle Alley, United, 6/63, Flyer.
    • Capri Bowling Alley, United, 6/63, LED display.
    • Rumpus, United, 5/63, a shuffle targette.

      Start of United UGLY era with new pinhood design and pointy art.

    • Fury Bowling Alley, United, 8/63, new style pinhood (ugly), LED display.
    • Ultra Shuffle Alley, United, 8/63.
    • Skippy Shuffle Alley, United, 11/63.
    • Jill-Jill Shuffle Alley, United, 11/63, novelty (NY only).
    • Futura Bowling Alley, United, 12/63, LED display.

    1964:

    1965:

    1966:

    • Tango Shuffle Alley, United, 2/66.
    • Amazon Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 3/66, five different scoring games, pointy artwork.
    • Blazer Shuffle Alley, United, 6/66, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Aztec Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 9/66, five different scoring games, non-pointy artwork.
    • Encore Shuffle Alley, United, 10/66, Flyer, BG, Game.

    1967:

    1968:

    • Alpha Shuffle Alley, United, 1968, Flyer, Game.
    • Delta Shuffle Alley, United, 1968, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Pegasus Shuffle Alley, United, 1968.
    • Gamma Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1968, BG, Game, Flyer.
    • Century Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 9/68, 13/16 foot lengths (additional 4 and 8 foot sections available), 5 games.
    • Centenial Bowling Alley, United/Williams, 1968, the same game as Century with minor artwork changes.

    1969:

    • Beta shuffle alley, United, 1969, Game.
    • Epsilon Shuffle Alley, United, 1969, Flyer, BG.

    1970:

    1971:

    • Cimarron Shuffle Alley, United, 1971, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Times Square Shuffle Alley, United, 3/71, Flyer.
    • Liberty Bell Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 9/71, Flyer, Game.

    1972:

    • Windy City Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1/72, Flyer.
    • French Quarter Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 3/72, Flyer.
    • Gateway Arch Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 5/72, Flyer.
    • Astrodome Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 8/72, Flyer.
    • Cape Cod Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 12/72, Flyer.

    1973:

    • Las Vegas, United/Williams, 1/73.
    • Twin Cities Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 8/73, Flyer.
    • Royal Hawaiian Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 10/73, Flyer, BG, Game.

    1974:

    • Pinnacle Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 2/74, Flyer.
    • Golden Triangle Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 4/74, Flyer, BG.
    • Granite Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 6/74, Flyer.
    • Civic Center shuffle alley, United, 9/74, BG, Game, Game.
    • Unique Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 11/74, Flyer.

    1975:

    • Supreme Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 2/75, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Marquis Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 6/75, Flyer, Game, BG.

    1976:

    • Star Sapphire Shuffle Alley, United, 1/76, Flyer.
    • Seville Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 6/76, BG, Game.
    • Emerald Shuffle Alley, United, 10/76, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Cavalier Shuffle Alley, United, 12/76, Flyer.

    1977:

    • Cherokee Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 6/77, Flyer.
    • Thunderbird Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1977, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Nugget Shuffle Alley, United, 10/77, Flyer.

    1978:

    • Casino Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1978, Flyer.
    • Pompeii Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1978, solidstate, Flyer, BG, Game, Game.
    • Topaz Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1978, first solidstate United bowler, Flyer, BG.

    1979:

    • Aristocrat Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1979, solidstate system3, Flyer, Flyer, BG, Game.
    • Taurus Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1979, Flyer.
    • King Tut Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 8/79, solidstate, Flyer, Flyer, Game, Inside.

    1980:

    1983:

    • Big Strike Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1983, a system7 SS bowler, Flyer, BG, Game, Inside.
    • Triple Strike Shuffle Alley, United/Williams, 1983, the last "United" shuffle alley, Flyer, Flyer.

    1984:

    1985:

    • Alley Cats Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1985, Flyer, BG, Promo Pic.
    • Kick-a-Poo II, United, 1985, a shuffle targette, prototype only.

    1986:

    1988:

    • Gold Mine Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1988, Flyer, Game.
    • Top Dawg Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1988, Flyer, BG, BG, Game.

    1989:

    • Shuffle Inn Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1989, Flyer, Flyer.

    1991:

    • Strike Master Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1991, dot matrix score display, last shuffle alley made by Williams/United, Flyer, Flyer, BG, Pins, Game.

    1996:

    • League Champ Shuffle Alley, Williams, 1996, dot matrix score display, Flyer.


Other Brands of Bowling Alleys.
    Bally (alphabetic).
    • 1964 Deluxe Bowler (bowling alley), Bally, 1964, swivel-action pins, 4.5" balls, 16 feet (additional 5 foot sections available), basically the same as the 1965 & 1966 Bally Bowlers.
    • 1965 Bally Bowler (bowling alley), Bally, 1965, swivel-action pins, 4.5" balls, 16 feet (additional 5 foot sections available), basically the same game as the 1964 & 1966 Deluxe Bowler.
    • 1966 Bally Bowler (bowling alley), Bally, 1966, swivel-action pins, 4.5" balls, 16 feet (additional 5 foot sections available), basically the same game as the 1964& 1965 Bally Bowler.
    • 1969 Bally Super Bowler (bowling alley), Bally, 1969, Bally's last ball bowler, swivel-action pins, 4.5" balls, 16 feet (additional 5 foot sections available), basically the same game as the 1964, 1965, 1966 Bally Bowler.
    • A.B.C. Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 7/55, Bally's first bowler.
    • A.B.C. Bowling Lanes (bowling alley), Bally, 2/57, Bally's first ball bowler, 3" balls, 14 foot long (though it seems a 11 foot version was also available).
    • A.B.C. Tournament (bowling alley), Bally, 5/57, 3.5" balls.
    • A.B.C. Champion (bowling alley), Bally, 8/57, 4" balls.
    • A.B.C. Super Deluxe Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 9/57.
    • All-Star Deluxe Bowler, Bally, 1/58, aka All-Star Bowler & Super Bowler, two player, pinball sized bowlers (5 1/2 feet long), with a ball that actually hits the pins, scores regulation bowling points.
    • All The Way (shuffle alley), Bally, 10/65, the last Bally shuffle alley.
    • Bally Alley, Bally, 11/39, one player, a motor spins the bowling ball by the player until the player releases it and it hits the alley and spins down the alley (not to be confused with the 1974 Bally Alley/Bally Lane wall/pedestal games).
    • Bally Alley, Bally, 1974, wall/pedestal game.
    • Bank Ball, Bally, 1962, two player skee ball game, Flyer, Game, Head.
    • Bally Baseball, Bally, 1950s (exact date unknown).
    • Bally Lane, Bally, 1974, wall/pedestal game.
    • Big 7 Shuffle (shuffle alley), Bally, 9/62.
    • Challenger (bowling alley), Bally, 9/59, 4" balls.
    • Blue Ribbon (shuffle alley), Bally, 3/55, Flyer, Flyer, Flyer, Flyer.
    • Champion (shuffle alley), Bally, 5/54.
    • Club Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 2/59, game.
    • Club Deluxe Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 5/59.
    • Congress Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 7/55, BG, Game, Guts.
    • Deluxe ABC Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 7/55, BG, BG, Game.
    • Deluxe Bally Bowler (bowling alley), Bally, 12/63, 16 feet (additional 5 foot sections available too), big number score reels.
    • De Luxe Bowler, Bally, 3/48, skee ball game, aka Bally De Luxe Bowler.
    • Deluxe Jumbo (shuffle alley), Bally, 4/60.
    • Gold Medal (shuffle alley), Bally, 3/55.
    • Jet Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 8/54.
    • Jumbo Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 9/55.
    • Jumbo Deluxe Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 9/60.
    • King Pin Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 5/55.
    • Lucky Alley (bowling alley), Bally, 8/58, 4.5" balls, made as both a normal and a contact bowler.
    • Lucky Shuffle Alley, Bally, 9/58.
    • Magic (shuffle alley), Bally, 12/54.
    • Monarch (shuffle alley), Bally, 11/59.
    • Mystic (shuffle alley), Bally, 12/54.
    • Official Jumbo (shuffle alley), Bally, 3/60, Pic.
    • Pan American (bowling alley), Bally, 1/59, 4" balls, Flyer.
    • Rocket Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 8/54.
    • Shuffle-Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 12/49, Bally first shuffle alley, one player, light scoring, pucks cycle under playfield and come back to player at the coin door, BG, Game.
    • Speed Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 11/58.
    • Star Shuffle, Bally, 10/58.
    • Strikes and Spares (shuffle alley), Bally, 1985, no moving parts, Flyer, Flyer.
    • Strike Bowler (bowling alley), Bally, 11/57, 4" balls, early versions of this game were a Contact bowler, but game was converted to roll-over switches and the same backglass was used.
    • Super 8 Shuffle (shuffle alley), Bally, 4/63.
    • Super Bowler, Bally, 1/58, two players. pinball sized bowlers (5 1/2 feet long), with a ball that actually hits the pins, scores regulation bowling points.
    • Super Shuffle (shuffle alley), Bally, 12/61.
    • 10 Pin Champ, Bally/Midway, late 1984, a follow up to 10 Pin Deluxe, a color video monitor for scores, lighted backbox bowling pins, Flyer,
    • 10 Pin Deluxe, Bally/Midway, 1984, a color video monitor for scores, lighted backbox bowling pins, Flyer, Flyer. Game, Game.
    • Trophy Bowler (bowling alley), Bally, 4/58, 4" balls, Contact bowler.
    • Victory (shuffle alley), Bally, 5/54, BG. Note Exhibit Supply also sold a conversion for this game to turn it into a bowling alley (ball bowler). Game, Game, Game, Game.
    • Whiz Bowler (shuffle alley), Bally, 12/58.

    Chicago Coin (Alphabetic) aka CDI, CCM.

    • Advance Bowler shuffle Alley, Chicago Coin, 10/53.
    • All American Basketball, Chicago Coin, 1967, puck bowler with a basketball theme and scoring, backglass animation that shots balls into a basket in the backbox via kickout holes.
    • Americana (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1968.
    • Arrow Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/55.
    • Bel-Air (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/65, Belair.
    • Big Strike (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1976, game.
    • Blinker Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 8/55, BG, Game.
    • Bonus Score Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 5/55.
    • Bowl-A-Ball, Chicago Coin, 1952, 3" balls. The first roll-down style bowler. Not really a ball bowler, though it does use balls. The balls roll back down the lane and fall into a tray.
    • Bowling Alley (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1950, probably Chicago Coin's first shuffle alley, two players, backglass light scoring, BG, Game. Pins. Here's another 1950 CCM Bowling Alley that was 'updated' by a Chicago Coin or maybe a distributor. Note the addition of lighted pins on the alley (non-moving, with an added solid red panel infront of the original BG pin lights), and the professionally repainted cabinet (but not the backbox). The background to the backglass is a different color than the above Bowling Alley, so perhaps this update was done by the factory. BG, Game.
    • Bowling League (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 2/57, Chicago Coin's first ball bowler, 3" balls.
    • Bowling Classic (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, date unknown.
    • Bowling Team (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 10/55.
    • Bowl Master (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 8/59.
    • Bulls Eye Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 7/55.
    • Bulls Eye Drop Ball (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 12/59, a puck bowler with a ball dropping theme. Slide the puck down the alley just like in bowling, but there are three "zones" for the puck to hit at the back of the alley. As the game is playing, small plastic balls are being lifted inside the backbox, behind the backglass on the right side. When the balls get to the top of the lift, they are pushed out onto a metal slide that makes them roll down towards the left side of the backglass. The metal slide is made up of three separate metal pieces, each representing one zone on the alley. As the ball is rolling, the player slides the puck and aims for the zone where the ball is currently rolling. When the puck hits the back of the alley, the metal slide is "opened" and the ball drops down like in a pachinko game. Depending on which hole the ball falls into at the bottom of the window, you get that many points. During the game, the balls continue to cycle through, rolling down the metal ramps. The key is to have good timing to drop the ball just right into the highest scoring hole. Twenty shots per game. BG, BG, BG, Game, Game, Game, Game, Instructions.
    • Cadillac (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1/64, swing-away backbox cabinet for easier service, 13/16/21 foot lengths, 6 games.
    • Caprice (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1971, BG, Game.
    • Champion Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1976, Flyer, Flyer.
    • Champagne (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1969.
    • Championship Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 11/56.
    • Citation (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 10/62, Flyer.
    • Citation (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1973.
    • Classic Bowling League (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 7/57, 4.5" balls.
    • Continental (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 10/61, 4.5" balls, large score reels.
    • Corvette (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/66.
    • Criss Cross Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 12/53, BG, Game.
    • Criss Cross Ski Ball (skeeball), Chicago Coin, circa 1956, 4 player skee ball game.
    • Crown Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1953, BG, Game.
    • DeVille (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 8/64.
    • Double Feature (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 12/58.
    • Double-Score Shuffle Alley, Chicago Coin, 1952, early shuffle with score reels, strikes score as 30 points, spares score as 20 points, certain frames score double the pin points. Head, Game.
    • Duchess Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 8/60, 4.5" balls, large score reels.
    • Duke Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 8/60, 4.5" balls, large score reels.
    • Eldorado (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1973, BG, Game, Game.
    • Esquire, Chicago Coin, 1970, BG, game, game.
    • Explorer Rocket (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 6/58.
    • Feature Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 7/54.
    • Festival (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/72.
    • Fireball Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 11/54.
    • Flair (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 10/66, large 6" balls with a single thumb hole, much like CCM's Vegas.
    • Flash Bowler (shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 10/54.
    • Fleetwood (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1967, lazy susan swivel score rack, 13.5/16.5 foot lengths, 4.5" balls, 6 games.
    • Four Game Shuffle alley (4 Game Shuffle), Chicago Coin, 11/59, BG, BG, Game.
    • Galaxy (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1969.
    • Gayety (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1970, flyer.
    • Gold Crown bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 3/62, model 250, large score reels.
    • Gold Medal bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 1973, the last EM ball bowler by any major manufacturer (CCM, United or Bally).
    • Gold Mine (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1975.
    • Gold Star (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 8/65.
    • Grand (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/63, first game with "swing-away" servicing (which was only used for a couple ball bowlers until the "lazy susan" rotating backbox idea was introduced), normal sized score reels (large score reels abandoned), 13, 16, 21 foot length, 6 games, similar to Grand Prize bowling alley.
    • Grand Prize (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/63, first game with "swing-away" servicing (which was only used for a couple ball bowlers until the "lazy susan" rotating backbox idea was introduced), normal sized score reels (large score reels abandoned), 13, 16, 21 foot length, 6 games, similar to Grand bowling alley.
    • Grand Spare Lite (Official Spare Lite - bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 9/63, normal sized score reels.
    • Hi-Speed Triple-Score Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1950s (exact date unknown), BG, Game.
    • Holiday Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/54, Game.
    • Holiday (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1972, 13/16 foot lengths (additional 4 and 8 foot extensions available), 4.5" balls, 5 games (with Beer frame).
    • Hollywood Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 4/55, Game, Game, BG.
    • Imperial (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 10/66, Game, BG.
    • King Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/59, 4.5" balls, first CCM ball bowler with large score reels, not to be confused with the later "Hi-Score King Bowler".
    • King Pin, Chicago Coin, 12/51, a pinball machine with fly away style pins like a bowler.
    • Lucky Strike Bowling League (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1/58, 4.5" balls.
    • Match-Bowl-a-Ball, Chicago Coin, late 1950s (exact date unknown), ball bowler, single game. Game, BG, Lane.
    • Majestic (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 8/64, 13/16/21 foot lengths, 6 games, last CCM game with oak lanes finished in a wood stain.
    • Miami Shuffle, Chicago Coin, 1951.
    • Mardi Gras (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1970.
    • Medalist (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 10/66.
    • Melody Lane (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1970s (exact date unknown), BG.
    • Monte Carlo (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1971, 13/16 foot lengths (additional 4 and 8 foot extensions available), lazy susan swivel score rack, 6 games (include Beer frame), 4.5" balls.
    • Official Spare Lite (Grand Spare Lite) - bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 9/63, normal sized score reels.
    • Park Lane (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1967.
    • Player's Choice (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 9/58, 4.5" balls, first CCM ball bowler with non-casket lane.
    • Playtime Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/54.
    • Playtime Deluxe Ski Ball with Criss Cross, Chicago Coin, 1967, same game as "Ski Ball" (1967) but with a different color scheme.
    • Prestige shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 1971, Flyer.
    • Preview (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 8/65, lazy susan swivel score rack, 13/17 foot lengths (4/8 foot extensions), 6 games.
    • Prince Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, about 1961 (exact date unknown), large score reels, 4.5" balls, 13.5', 16.5' or 21.5' length, 76"x37"x14" backbox, four different games.
    • Princess Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1/61, 4.5" balls, large score reels.
    • Pro Bowl (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1973, BG, Game.
    • Pro Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1/61, BG, Game.
    • Queen Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/59, 4.5" balls, large score reels.
    • Riviera (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1967, BG.
    • Rebound Shuffle, Chicago Coin, 12/58. Simple electronics: a coin mech, relays to drop the pins, and a frame counter in the middle (under the yellow strip), and simple contacts at the far end. When the puck hits the contacts it adds one to the count. When 8 are counted the frame advances one. When the 8 frames are played, the game ends and the pins pop up, ending the game. Game, Game.
    • Red Pin (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/59. BG, Game.
    • Red Pin Detroit Red Pin (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/59. Made specifically for the Detroit area. Does not use rollover switches but the puck hits the pins. BG, Game, Pins.
    • Red Dot (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1961.
    • Rocket Ball (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1/59.
    • Rocket Shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 2/58, one player, a ball popper shuffle alley like United's Shooting Star shuffle, BG, BG, Game, Lane.
    • Rocket Shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 3/58, *two* player, a ball popper shuffle alley.
    • Royal Crown bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 8/62, large score reels, six games, probably the second best CCM bowler (behind Majestic.)
    • Score-A-Line Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/55.
    • Shuffle Horseshoes (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, early 1950s (exact year unknown), 2 players, Game.
    • Shuffle Horseshoes (shuffle alley - 2nd version), Chicago Coin, early 1950s (exact year unknown), 2 players. Instead of hitting bowling pins, there are lighted horseshoe stakes at the end of the alley. If you slide the puck right, you can get a ringer just like in a real game of horseshoes. Vary your shot slightly and have your puck hit just to a side of the stake and you can get awarded varying points. A "blow" is not getting close to the stake, and you get zero points. Game, BG, Game, Alley, BG.
    • Six Game Bowler (6 Game Bowler - shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 6/60, BG.
    • Ski-Ball, Chicago Coin, 1957, skee-ball game, a shuffle alley using a ball and skee-alley scoring, 10 foot.
    • Skee Roll (deluxe), Chicago Coin, 1/57, a ball bowler using skee-alley scoring, 11 or 13 foot long, skee-ball.
    • Ski Ball with Criss Cross, Chicago Coin, 1967, skee ball game with a criss cross option.
    • Ski-Score (deluxe), Chicago Coin, 1957, a ski-ball type bowler with 3" wood balls, 4 frames per game with 2 or 3 shots per frame.
    • Skyline (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1968, BG, Game.
    • Spotlite (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 11/63.
    • Starfire (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1968, 13.5/16.5 foot lengths, lazy susan swivel score rack, 4.5" balls, 6 games.
    • Starlite Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1963, CCM Star Lite has six games, Game.
    • Strike Ball (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 5/63, Game, Game.
    • Super Bowl (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1972.
    • Superbowl bowling alley, Chicago Coin, late 1970s (exact date unknown), uses Bally/Stern solidstate board system, one of the last ball bowlers made.
    • Super Frame Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 3/54. Game.
    • Super-Sonic (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/65, lazy susan swivel score rack, 13/17 foot lengths, 6 games.
    • Thunderbolt Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 12/54.
    • Top Brass (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 4/65.
    • Top Hat (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1969, lazy susan swivel score rack, 4.5" balls, 13.5/16.5 foot lengths, six games (including a beer frame).
    • Tournament (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 12/64, 13/16/21 foot lengths (5/8/10 foot extensions available), 6 games, oak lanes now painted gray instead of a natural wood stain, lane now lit with florescent lamps under pinhood.
    • Tournament Ski-Ball, Chicago Coin, 1957, skee-ball game, a shuffle alley using a ball and skee-alley scoring, 10 foot.
    • Triple Gold Pin Pro (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/61.
    • Triple Score (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1952, 30/20 strike/spare scoring, frames 5, 7, 10 give "Triple" score. BG.
    • Triple Strike Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/55.
    • Triumph (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1/65, BG, Game.
    • T.V. Bowling League (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 11/57, 4.5" balls, Contact bowler, TV Bowling League.
    • Twin Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 12/58, 4" balls, two ball bowlers right next to each other in a single game(!)
    • Varsity shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 1969, BG, Game.
    • Variety (roll down), Chicago Coin, 1/62, 3" balls,
    • Vegas Bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 1967, giant oversized 6" balls with a single finger hole (but can be used with standard 4.5" balls too), lazy susan swivel score rack, 6 games, much like CCM Flair.
    • World Series (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/60, a baseball shuffle alley, light animated backglass runners.

    Chicago Coin (Chronological) aka CDI, CCM.

    • Bowling Classic (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, date unknown.
    • Hi-Speed Triple-Score Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1950s (exact date unknown), BG, Game.
    • Match-Bowl-a-Ball, Chicago Coin, late 1950s (exact date unknown), ball bowler, single game. Game, BG, Lane.
    • Shuffle Horseshoes (shuffle alley - 2nd version), Chicago Coin, early 1950s (exact year unknown), 2 players. Instead of hitting bowling pins, there are lighted horseshoe stakes at the end of the alley. If you slide the puck right, you can get a ringer just like in a real game of horseshoes. Vary your shot slightly and have your puck hit just to a side of the stake and you can get awarded varying points. A "blow" is not getting close to the stake, and you get zero points. Game, BG, Game, Alley, BG.
    • Shuffle Horseshoes (shuffle alley - 2nd version), Chicago Coin, early 1950s (exact year unknown), 2 players, Game.

    • Bowling Alley (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1950, probably Chicago Coin's first shuffle alley, two players, backglass light scoring, BG, Game. Pins. Here's another 1950 CCM Bowling Alley that was 'updated' by a Chicago Coin or maybe a distributor. Note the addition of lighted pins on the alley (non-moving, with an added solid red panel infront of the original BG pin lights), and the professionally repainted cabinet (but not the backbox). The background to the backglass is a different color than the above Bowling Alley, so perhaps this update was done by the factory. BG, Game.
    • Miami Shuffle, Chicago Coin, 1951.
    • King Pin, Chicago Coin, 12/51, a pinball machine with fly away style pins like a bowler.
    • Bowl-A-Ball, Chicago Coin, 1952, 3" balls. The first roll-down style bowler. Not really a ball bowler, though it does use balls. The balls roll back down the lane and fall into a tray.
    • Double-Score (Shuffle Alley), Chicago Coin, 1952, early shuffle with score reels, strikes score as 30 points, spares score as 20 points, certain frames score double the pin points. Head, Game.
    • Triple Score (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1952, 30/20 strike/spare scoring, frames 5, 7, 10 give "Triple" score. BG.
    • Advance Bowler shuffle Alley, Chicago Coin, 10/53.
    • Criss Cross Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 12/53, BG, Game.
    • Crown Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1953, BG, Game.
    • Super Frame Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 3/54. Game.
    • Feature Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 7/54.
    • Holiday Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/54, Game.
    • Playtime Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/54.
    • Flash Bowler (shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 10/54.
    • Fireball Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 11/54.
    • Thunderbolt Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 12/54.
    • Triple Strike Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/55.
    • Hollywood Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 4/55, Game, Game, BG.
    • Arrow Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/55.
    • Bonus Score Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 5/55.
    • Bulls Eye Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 7/55.
    • Blinker Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 8/55, BG, Game.
    • Score-A-Line Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/55.
    • Bowling Team (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 10/55.
    • Deluxe Ski-Score, Chicago Coin, mid 1950s (exact date unknown), a ski-ball type bowler with 3" wood balls, 4 frames per game with 2 or 3 shots per frame, BG, BG, Game.
    • Championship Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 11/56.

      CCM Ball Bowler era.

    • Deluxe Skee Roll, Chicago Coin, 1/57, a ball bowler using skee-alley scoring, 11 or 13 foot long, Flyer.
    • Tournament Ski-Bowl, Chicago Coin, 1/57, a shuffle alley using a ball and skee-alley scoring, 10 foot.
    • Criss Cross Ski Ball (skeeball), Chicago Coin, circa 1956, 4 player skee ball game.
    • Bowling League (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 2/57, Chicago Coin's first ball bowler, 3" balls.
    • Tournament Ski-Bowl, Chicago Coin, 1/57, a shuffle alley using a ball and skee-alley scoring, 10 foot.
    • Skee Roll (deluxe), Chicago Coin, 1/57, a ball bowler using skee-alley scoring, 11 or 13 foot long, Flyer.
    • Ski-Score (deluxe), Chicago Coin, 1957, a ski-ball type bowler with 3" wood balls, 4 frames per game with 2 or 3 shots per frame.
    • Skee Roll (deluxe), Chicago Coin, 1/57, a ball bowler using skee-alley scoring, 11 or 13 foot long, skee-ball.
    • Classic Bowling League (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 7/57, 4.5" balls.
    • T.V. Bowling League (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 11/57, 4.5" balls, Contact bowler, TV Bowling League.
    • Lucky Strike Bowling League (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1/58, 4.5" balls, Contact bowler.
    • Rocket Shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 2/58, one player, a ball popper shuffle alley like United's Shooting Star shuffle, BG, BG, Game, Lane.
    • Rocket Shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 3/58, *two* player, a ball popper shuffle alley.
    • Explorer Rocket (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 6/58.

      Ball bowler non-casket style lane and vertical metal coin box era.

    • Player's Choice (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 9/58, 4.5" balls, first CCM ball bowler with non-casket lane, protruding-nose style pinhood.
    • Double Feature (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 12/58.
    • Rebound Shuffle, Chicago Coin, 12/58. Simple electronics: a coin mech, relays to drop the pins, and a frame counter in the middle (under the yellow strip), and simple contacts at the far end. When the puck hits the contacts it adds one to the count. When 8 are counted the frame advances one. When the 8 frames are played, the game ends and the pins pop up, ending the game. Game, Game.
    • Twin Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 12/58, 4" balls, two ball bowlers right next to each other in a single game(!), protruding-nose style pinhood.
    • Rocket Ball (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1/59.
    • Red Pin (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/59. BG, Game.
    • Red Pin Detroit Red Pin (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/59. Made specifically for the Detroit area. Does not use rollover switches but the puck hits the pins. BG, Game, Pins.

      Ball bowler large score reel era.

    • King Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/59, 4.5" balls, first CCM ball bowler with large score reels, not to be confused with the later "Hi-Score King Bowler", protruding-nose style pinhood.
    • Queen Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/59, 4.5" balls, large score reels, protruding-nose style pinhood.
    • Bowl Master (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 8/59.
    • Four Game Shuffle alley (4 Game Shuffle), Chicago Coin, 11/59, BG, BG, Game.
    • Bulls Eye Drop Ball (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 12/59, a puck bowler with a ball dropping theme. Slide the puck down the alley just like in bowling, but there are three "zones" for the puck to hit at the back of the alley. As the game is playing, small plastic balls are being lifted inside the backbox, behind the backglass on the right side. When the balls get to the top of the lift, they are pushed out onto a metal slide that makes them roll down towards the left side of the backglass. The metal slide is made up of three separate metal pieces, each representing one zone on the alley. As the ball is rolling, the player slides the puck and aims for the zone where the ball is currently rolling. When the puck hits the back of the alley, the metal slide is "opened" and the ball drops down like in a pachinko game. Depending on which hole the ball falls into at the bottom of the window, you get that many points. During the game, the balls continue to cycle through, rolling down the metal ramps. The key is to have good timing to drop the ball just right into the highest scoring hole. Twenty shots per game. BG, BG, BG, Game, Game, Game, Game, Instructions.
    • World Series (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/60, a baseball shuffle alley, light animated backglass runners.
    • Six Game Bowler (6 Game Bowler - shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 6/60, BG.

      Wedge style pinhood era. Larger score reels era.

    • Duchess Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 8/60, 4.5" balls, large score reels, wedge style pinhood.
    • Duke Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 8/60, 4.5" balls, large score reels, wedge style pinhood.
    • Pro Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1/61, BG, Game.
    • Princess Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1/61, 4.5" balls, large score reels, wedge style pinhood.
    • Prince Bowler (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, about 1961 (exact date unknown), large score reels, 4.5" balls, 13.5', 16.5' or 21.5' length, 76"x37"x14" backbox, four different games, wedge style pinhood.
    • Triple Gold Pin Pro (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/61.
    • Continental (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 10/61, 4.5" balls, large score reels.
    • Red Dot (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1961.
    • Variety (roll down), Chicago Coin, 1/62, 3" balls,
    • Gold Crown bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 3/62, model 250, large score reels.
    • Starlite Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1963, CCM Star Lite has six games, Game.
    • Royal Crown bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 8/62, large score reels, six games, probably the second best CCM bowler (behind Majestic.)
    • Citation (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 10/62, Flyer.
    • Star Light (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1963.

      Ball bowler gooseneck ("free-back", "swing-away", "hi-style") backbox era. Normal sized score reels.

    • Grand (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/63, first game with "swing-away" servicing (aka "free back" or "outlaw sprint wing", which was only used on four CCM bowlers), normal sized score reels (large score reels abandoned), 13, 16, 21 foot length, 6 games, similar to Grand Prize bowling alley.
    • Grand Prize (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/63, "swing-away" servicing (aka "free back" or "outlaw sprint wing", which was only used on four CCM bowlers), normal sized score reels (large score reels abandoned), 13, 16, 21 foot length, 6 games, similar to Grand bowling alley.
    • Strike Ball (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 5/63, Game, Game.
    • Official Spare Lite - bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 9/63, "swing-away" servicing (aka "free back" or "outlaw sprint wing", which was only used on four CCM bowlers), normal sized score reels, cool lane lights to show where to throw ball.
    • Grand Spare Lite - bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 9/63, normal sized score reels, proturding squared gooseneck pinhood ("swing-away" cabinet).
    • Spotlite (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 11/63.
    • Cadillac (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1/64, swing-away backbox cabinet for easier service with "free back" or "outlaw sprint wing", 13/16/21 foot lengths, 6 games.
    • DeVille (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 8/64.
    • Majestic (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 8/64, 13/16/21 foot lengths, 6 games, last CCM game with oak lanes finished in a wood stain, proturding squared gooseneck pinhood ("Hi-Style" cabinet). Majestic is, in my opinion, the end of the line for decent looking CCM ball bowlers. Majestic is also probably one of the best CCM ball bowlers, having a classic "look" with all the best features/games in a 4.5" big ball bowler.
    • Tournament (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 12/64, 13/16/21 foot lengths (5/8/10 foot extensions available), 6 games, proturding squared gooseneck pinhood ("Hi-Style" cabinet), "spare lit" backbox lights showing where to throw ball for a spare, oak lanes now painted gray instead of a natural wood stain, weird green backglass and cabinet paint (less traditional), lane now lit with florescent lamps under pinhood.
    • Triumph (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1/65, BG, Game.
    • Bel-Air (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 2/65, Belair.

      Ball bowler lazy susan backbox (less attractive) era.

    • Super-Sonic (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/65, first lazy susan swivel score rack (rounded gooseneck pinhood), 13/17 foot lengths, 6 games.
    • Top Brass (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 4/65.
    • Gold Star (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 8/65.
    • Preview (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 8/65, lazy susan swivel score rack (rounded gooseneck pinhood), 13/17 foot lengths (4/8 foot extensions), natural oak lanes with stenciled graphics, 6 games.
    • Corvette (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 3/66.
    • Flair (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 10/66, large 6" balls with a single thumb hole, much like CCM's Vegas.
    • Imperial (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 10/66, Game, BG.
    • Medalist (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 10/66.
    • All American Basketball, Chicago Coin, 1967, puck bowler with a basketball theme and scoring, backglass animation that shots balls into a basket in the backbox via kickout holes.
    • Fleetwood (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1967, lazy susan swivel score rack, 13.5/16.5 foot lengths, 4.5" balls, 6 games.
    • Park Lane (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1967.
    • Riviera (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1967, BG.
    • Vegas Bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 1967, giant oversized 6" balls with a single finger hole (but can be used with standard 4.5" balls too), lazy susan swivel score rack, 6 games, much like CCM Flair.
    • Ski Ball with Criss Cross, Chicago Coin, 1967, skee ball game with a criss cross option.
    • Playtime Deluxe Ski Ball with Criss Cross, Chicago Coin, 1967, same game as "Ski Ball" (1967) but with a different color scheme.
    • Americana (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1968.
    • Skyline (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1968, BG, Game.
    • Starfire (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1968, 13.5/16.5 foot lengths, lazy susan swivel score rack, 4.5" balls, 6 games.
    • Champagne (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1969.
    • Galaxy (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1969.
    • Top Hat (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1969, lazy susan swivel score rack, 4.5" balls, 13.5/16.5 foot lengths, six games (including a beer frame).
    • Varsity shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 1969, BG, Game.
    • Esquire, Chicago Coin, 1970, BG, game, game.
    • Gayety (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1970, flyer.
    • Mardi Gras (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1970.
    • Caprice (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1971, BG, Game.
    • Monte Carlo (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1971, 13/16 foot lengths (additional 4 and 8 foot extensions available), lazy susan swivel score rack, 6 games (include Beer frame), 4.5" balls.
    • Prestige shuffle alley, Chicago Coin, 1971, Flyer.
    • Festival (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 9/72.
    • Holiday (bowling alley), Chicago Coin, 1972, 13/16 foot lengths (additional 4 and 8 foot extensions available), 4.5" balls, 5 games (with Beer frame).
    • Super Bowl (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1972.
    • Citation (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1973.
    • Eldorado (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1973,
    • Gold Medal bowling alley, Chicago Coin, 1973, the last EM ball bowler by any major manufacturer (CCM, United or Bally). BG, Game, Game.
    • Pro Bowl (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1973, BG, Game.
    • Gold Mine (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1975.
    • Big Strike (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1976, game.
    • Champion Bowler (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1976, Flyer, Flyer.
    • Melody Lane (shuffle alley), Chicago Coin, 1970s (exact date unknown), BG.
    • Superbowl bowling alley, Chicago Coin, late 1970s (exact date unknown), uses Bally/Stern solidstate board system, one of the last ball bowlers made.

    Keeney.

    • ABC Bowler, Keeney, early 1950s (exact date unknown), one player shuffle alley with light box scoring, BG, BG, Game.
    • Bowlette, Keeney, 1957, skeeball bowling, adjustable for 5,7 or 10 frames. Has an extra ball feature that if the player hits the small 50 point hole, will continue play until this hole is missed.
    • Duck Pins (shuffle alley), Keeney, 6/50, two players, BG.
    • High Score League Bowler (shuffle alley), Keeney, early 1950s (exact date unknown), four players, light box scoring, BG, Game.
    • League Bowler (shuffle alley), Keeney, early 1950s (exact date unknown), four players, light box scoring, Game.
    • Ten Pins, Keeney, 1949, a roll-down type game which uses small 2" balls rolled down at shuffle alley. The Keeney 10 Pins' balls hit small pins, which retract through a string. The pins are held to the alley with magnets (this is the same concept used on the 1957 Williams Ten Strike/Ten Pins and the 1939-1953 Evans Ten Strike). The ball is returned to the player at the front coin door area via gravity.
    • Pin-boy (shuffle alley), Keeney, 1949, one player, light box scoring, BG, Game.
    • Roll-a-Line, Keeney, 1950s (exact date unknown), Flyer.
    • Speed Lane Bowler (shuffle alley), Keeney, 5/55, six players, BG, Game.
    • Team Bowler (shuffle alley), Keeney, date unknown, six players, BG, Game, Inside.

    Stern.

    • Black Beauty, Stern, 9/84, solid state puck bowler, Flyer.
    • Genesis Shuffle Alley, Stern, 1978, Flyer.
    • Stars & Strikes Ball Bowler, Stern, 1970s (exact date unknown), 4" balls, solidstate electronics, perhaps the last ball bowler made by any manufacturer, BG, Game, Game.

    Other.

    • Bowlette, Gottlieb, 3/50, 1000 produced, Gottlieb's only (shuffle) bowling machine, 69" long (17" longer than a pinball of this era), and just 22" wide. The game is incredible small compared to puck bowlers by other manufacturers. Uses two small 2" diameter pucks with the "Gottlieb" logo in the center. Puck slides under the pins, which turn off as "hit". Game also came with a metal "T" rake in case a puck was throw lightly (and didn't get past the pins). Puck is returned to the player at the front of the cabinet next to the coin door. If game is over, puck is kept inside the game and is not released until a new game is started.
    • Bowling Alley, Exhibit Supply Company (ESCO), date unknown.
    • Bowling League Shuffle Alley, Genco, 1950, single player, BG, BG, Cab.
    • Fantastic, Midway, 1967, shuffle alley painted in day-glow florescent paint, pink pins. flyer, BG, game, game, game.
    • Hurdle Hop, maker unknown, 1930s (exact date unknown), a small skeeball type game, Flyer.
    • Keeney King Pin, Keeeney, early 1950s (exact date unknown), one player shuffle alley which returns the puck thru a trough under the playfield, BG, Game, Game.
    • Official Skill Ball, Genco, 1950s (exact date unknown), a skee ball type game.
    • Pro Bowler, Sega, 1972, two players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game. Very similar to Williams' Mini Bowl (8/70). Five foot playfield length.
    • Pro Striker, Design Plus, 2005, six players, new ball bowler run by Pneumatics, 650 pounds. Available in 11, 15 or 19 foot lengths, uses two 4" balls, and has a large 64x132 pixel dot matrix display and ticket dispensor.
    • Roll-A-Ball, Square Amusement, 1930s (exact year unknown), skee-ball type game with a moving barrel center target.
    • Roll-a-ball, Williams, 1956, skee-ball type game.
    • Skee-Ball, Skee-Ball Inc. (formerly Philadelphia Toboggan Company), 1977 and newer, solidstate skee ball game (still in production today by ICE). Schematics and game manual available here (1.4meg).
    • Ski Fun, Midway, early 1960s (exact year unknown), 3" ball. Nine targets that move up and down. The goal is to try to hit certain patterns to score points, like 3 in a line, 3 diagonal, 4 corners, or spot certain numbers. Four shots per frame and there are 4 frames. BG, BG, Game.
    • Shuffle Pool, Genco, 1950s (exact year unknown), four player, a shuffle alley with a pool theme, Game.
    • Shuffle Target, Genco, 1954, two players, object is to shoot the puck when the highest score "peddle" rotates to the formica.
    • Thunder Bowl, AMF, recent (exact date unknown), a modern copy of the original 1960 United Bowlarama.
    • True Score, Keeney, 1950s (exact date unknown), 3" roll-down style ball bowler.
    • Twin Bowler, Universal, early 1950s (exact date unknown), two player shuffley alley with lightbox scoring. BG, game, lane.


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