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Vintage Coin Operated Fortune Tellers,
Arcade Games, Digger/Cranes, Gun Games
and other Penny Arcade games, pre-1977.

01/15/14, by cfh@provide.net

I buy, collect and restore vintage arcade games!
If you have any mechanical arcade games, fortune tellers, driving game, cranes/driggers, gun games or other coin operated penny arcade games for sale, please contact cfh@provide.net

Arcade Games I am Looking For.
I am especially interest in any fortune tellers, Sega EM arcade games, or any Genco arcade games. Particularly games like Space Age (Genco 1958), Quarterback (Genco 1957). Also looking for other arcade games including Jet Fighter (Williams 1954), Mystic Swami (Mutoscope 1954), Batter Up (CCM 1958), Play Ball (Evans 1941), Bat-A-Score (Evans 1948), K.O. Champ (Mutoscope 1955), Midget Skee Ball (CCM 1949), Skee-Ball-Ette (Gottlieb 1940), Ski-Ball (Evans 1940), In the Barrel (Evans 1940). I am also looking for gun games such as Bally Derby (1960), Bally Gun Smoke (1959), Bally Space Gunner (1958).

How to find a game easily in this document: This document is organized alphabetically by game type. To easily find a particular game, use the CTRL-F function of your browser, and type in part or all of the game's name to search this document.

Introduction:
This document covers coin operated electro-mechanical arcade games as found at penny arcades during the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Pretty much any penny arcade game up to the video game era (pre-1977). Arcade video games started to come out about 1976, and none of these are covered here. This document only pertains to games that used mechanical and electro-mechanical devises to created their game play. I personally find these games to be extremely interesting, as the designers came up with some amazing games without using much more than relays and switches, and their imagination and ingenuity. Some 1970s arcade games do have electronic sound boards. Those are Ok too, just they can't have a video screen of any kind!

Included here are electro-mechanical fortune tellers, arcade games, driving games, gun games, diggers/cranes, and sports games. These are the games that I personally find fun to collect, restore and play in my basement. Obviously not all pre-1977 penny arcade games are covered here, but I will update this guide as more pictures and information becomes available. Also there is some overlap on this site with my Baseball pitch & bat, Sports, Manikin and Animated games web site, and my Bowling and Shuffle Alley web site. This was done to present a more complete penny arcade game picture here. Be sure to check out the Penny Arcade and Coin-Op Location Pictures web page too. No game specific information, but very cool arcade pictures from days past.

Fortune Tellers.
Coin operated fortune tellers have always been popular at penny arcades. The 1950s Genco fortune tellers such as Gypsy Grandma (Genco 5/57) and Horoscope Grandma (Genco 5/57) are my favorites. These have an advanced (for the time) animatronic gypsy or grandma figure that moves, deal cards, breathes, and gives out a paper fortune which the patron takes with them. Though fortune tellers go against my "playing fun factor" (you really don't play a fortune teller!), there is something very unique about these machines that captures the imagination of everyone. The early animatronics seem quite realistic (especially given the era in which they were made). The 1988 Tom Hanks movie "Big" didn't hurt the popularity of fortune tellers either (Hanks visits a boardwalk fortune teller who transforms him from a 13 year old kid to an adult). The earliest fortune teller models were made by the Mills Novelty Company. Their two best (Verbille, which resembled a gypsy in the back of her wagon), and Sibille. These early fortune tellers had phonograph players inside and would spreak your fortune, but had no animatronics. In the 1930 to 1950s, International Mutoscope, Doraldina Company, Genco, Mike munves and others had fortune tellers but they lost their voice. To compensate they had motion; breathing, eyes moving, hand waving, head nodding, etc. They also vended a card with your fortune. This style continued until the late 1960's when Prophetron Company made Zoltan, which used an 8-track tape player to deliver an audio fortune to the customer and did not have any animatronics. Today's new fortune tellers often have both animatronics and a sound track.

Also cute from this era are love testers and fortune vendors, mostly made by Exhibit Supply from the 1930s to 1950s. This included Kiss-O-Meter, Egyptian Ramasees, Smiling Same the Voodoo Man, Magic Heart, Magic Pen, Mystic Eye, Love Pilot, Love Teller, Magic Ball, Blow Ball, Cupids Post Office and others. Basically these were light animated fortune tellers that were more simply in design.

Exhibit Supply Love Testers and fortune vendors.

Mechanical Gun, Rifle Games.
Welcome to America, where the right to bear arms is in the Constitution! Well I don't own any real guns, but I do own a gun game or two. Hey, no one gets hurt and the kids love them. And I'm talking about mechanical arcade gun games here, not a video gun game. Some popular gun games are the early Seeburg light actived gun games (known as the Ray-O-Lite/Rayolite/Rayolight Rifle Range style) like Chicken Sam (1939 Seeburg) and Shoot the Bear (1947 Seeburg), with my favorite being the controversial 1942 World War 2 conversion of Chicken Sam into Seeburg's Kill the Jap & Trap the Jap. This Rayolite of gun game was made mostly during the 1930s and 1940s, and the Ray-o-lite gun was "free form" and not attached to the game (other than with an electrical cord, and the gun housed in a free form gun stand). Usually these game are very mechanical (for example, in Shoot the Bear the bear actually rears-up and turns when he is hit), and often have a jukebox-style amplifier for sound effects. The disadvantage to the Rayolight type of gun game is the amount of space required. The gun/gun stand are about 15 to 25 feet from the gun's remote target cabinet, and are attached by a long cord. The combination of vacuum tube design and mechanical innovation really makes this style of gun game a challenging project.

The other style of gun game was first invented in the 1920s by Gent and Fey. These use wipers and electrical contacts to aim the gun and sense target hits from the game mounted gun. In 1947 Eldon Dale made the Gent/Fey gun concept much better with his "Dale Gun". This combined Gent & Fey's wiper/contact system into a more practical/compact cabinet, and with good realism. The trick to the Dale gun games was mirror(s), used like a periscope. This allowed the Dale gun cabinet to be shallow (about 2' deep) and more upright, yet give a perception of up to seven feet (the 2' depth, plus 4' of vertical cabinet). The player is actually looking at a mirror (or multiple mirrors, depending on the game), angled to the gun. The targets are in the bottom of the cabinet (at the player's feet). This makes the shallow gun cabinet feel much bigger, like the targets are farther away. Also multiple mirrors can be used to give a 3-D type dimension to the targets. The majority of gun games from the 1947 to 1976 were the wiper/contact Dale (mirror) gun variety.

In 1964 the Dale style gun games got Black Lights. This feature was first used by Midway with Rifle Champ and Space Gun, but it was soon adapted by all the gun game makers. Now the inside targets were painted with florescent paint, giving them an erie glow under the black light. Because this was such a good effect, all Dale-style gun games from 1964 and later used black light(s).

By the 1968, many gun (and other arcade games) had electronic sound. These were sound boxes with a minimal amount of short sound bites (usually three distinct sounds). By the 1969 many EM (Electro Mechanical) Dale gun games (and many other arcade games) had 8-track background sound, making them quite fun. Chicago Coin and Midway made a bunch of these in the early 1970s, like the 1971 Wild Kingdom gun game. One of the sound tracks would be the background sound, and on some games like Midway's Haunted House the other tracks are used for speciality sounds.

In general the 1970s EM Midway gun games were the most complicated, marrying early solidstate circuits with EM (electro-mechanical) circuits. For example, Midway used solidstate circuits to control target motor speeds. Also Midway used motorized score reels. In addition Midway often integrated an 8-track tape player into a game using solidstate circuits. Unfortunately the more complicated Midway gun games did not necessarily make Midway gun games better. CCM guns and Williams guns (Stockade and Ambush are my two favorites) are much simplier to maintain and fix and are just as much fun (if not more fun).

Most of gun games also had a big 120 volt coil connected to the gun to provide some recoil when the gun was fired. This provides a very realistic effect to the gun, but unfortunately this coil is often burnt. A good concept of the 1970s is twin gun games, where there are actually two rifles on a single game. This provided great simultaneous competition between two players. One target to shot, two players shooting it. The fastest and most accurate shooter gets the points. These are really fun, but the cabinet size if often bigger, making it difficult to get one of these into your basement! Chicago Coin and Midway made these (no double Williams gun games), with CCM's Twin Rifle being one of the best.

The last generation of mechanical gun games combined the Dale gun mirror system with the Seeburg light activated system. Midway made this variety during the mid 1970s, like Midway's 1974 Twin Pirate Gun. At first this type of light activated Dale gun game is not obvious, as it looks like a regular wiper/contact (stylist) Dale type gun. But of course there are no gun wipers or contacts. This style of gun game is generally considered to not be very desirable. This is because ambient light in the room confused the scoring, making the game very fussy about scoring hits, and players felt gypped. Also a flashlight could be used to run the score up. But the problems with these 1970s Midway lightray games stem from the light sensors in the targets. With time the targets become less sensitive to light, and don't score well. Unfortunately it's a dated design and finding replacment light sensors is difficult. This makes repairing the Midway light ray style gun games more of a challange than a standard "stylist" type gun game (like Williams and CCM used).

Of the 1970s gun game makers, Williams is certainly the easiest gun games to work on and to keep running. Williams used pinball technology in their gun games, so they are familiar to EM pinball techs. Also parts are readily since they are basically the same as pinball parts. Williams did not use tape players for sound (except on one game, 1970 Bonanza), so there are no issues with worn-out tapes or missing players. And their electronic sound cards are pretty robust. But on the other hand Williams didn't push the technology envelope like say Midway, making Williams guns not as feature robust (generally speaking). But for an EM pinball tech, a Williams gun game is easy to repair. On the other hand Midway gun games are generally the most difficult to fix. The motorized score reels and use of early solidstate circuits for motor and game control can be a challange to repair. Also Midway parts are not as plentiful as Williams. Midway's later use of light activation also relied more on solidstate circuits. Most pinball techs will be challenged by a broken Midway gun game. Chicago Coin (CCM) gun games are easier to repair than Midway, since like Williams they only used solidstate technology for sound. But CCM gun games not as robust as Williams gun games. CCM generally used inferior quality parts that didn't stand up as well as Williams parts. Also CCM guns seem to have more issues with aiming, again probably because of lower quality parts.

Mechanical Driving Games.
Ah, America again, where everyone has a car (or two!) and loves to drive. So why not a vintage driving game? Now I'm not talking about those video game drivers today, but the pre-video mechanical driving games which are way more quite unique and innovative. Generally there are two types of EM driving games. Many use a round translucent artwork drum with a light inside. As the drum rotates, the driving scenery changes, like Road Racer (Williams 3/62). Other types of early driving game I really like have miniature cars that the driver steers remotely. Speedway (Southland Eng. 1960s) is very cool, as it's essentially a slot car track in a pinball machine. Also Motorama (Genco 10/57) and is very interesting. The player steers a toy car, and has a lever for forward and reverse. The object is to steer onto the different targets, ramps, etc. On Sidewalk Engineer (Williams 4/55), the player drives a bulldozer through the game moving sand in a sandbox for 60 seconds (no scoring, no prizes!) Also Stunt Car (Sega 8/70) is a another similar game. These are pretty unique games, nothing like the video driving games of today.

Left: 1926-1949 style Mutoscope.
Right: 1890s-1909 style Clam Mutoscope.
Pictures by Jukebox Ed.


Coin Operated Moving Picture Shows (Mutoscopes).
In the late 1800's American Mutoscope and Biograph Company of New York began producing coin operated picture peep shows where a crank is turned and about 1500 cards with photographs were displayed. This sequential flickering live action created a motion picture. These early units are known as the "clam shell" Mutoscope, as the outside has a large clam shell cast into the side of the unit. In 1909 Mutoscope production of the coin operated clam shell machines stopped. But in the 1920's, Bill Rabkin purchased the rights to manufacture Mutoscope machines again, and formed a new company called "International Mutoscope Reel Company". From 1926 until 1949, they produced heavy Mutoscope machines using the same style card reels as the earlier machines (but not the pre-1910 style clam shell version), with sheet metal sides and an open frame stand. Then about 1950, Mutoscope changed to more post-WW2 style viewer box with a closed stand. These were available from Mike Munves through the 1950s. Mutoscope viewers are always popular and reproduction reels are still being made and can be used in the original picture viewers.

Diggers and Cranes.
The classic day of the digger was in the 1930s, as there were over 35 companies building and selling diggers/cranes. Sales were directed to the owners of Penny Arcades, Boardwalks and Beachfront Amusement Parks, but more elaborate models were designed to be operated in the finest Hotel Lobbies, Department Stores, and Train Stations. These "Hotel Models" were mostly floor-standing console models, and the woodwork was often similar to fine wood furniture, often with highly polished and painted cast metal trim in an art-deco style. Most models were powered by an electric motor, however some had a hand crank. A few diggers of the Deco era type were built during and after World War II, until 1951. There were also Carnival type diggers/cranes. Carnival companies during the 1930s did not always have reliable electric service so the 'hand crank' models were prefered. This meant the Erie Digger was popular for the traveling shows. Exhibit Supply, International Mutoscope, Bally, Scientific Machine and others followed by offering hand-crank models. Also, the carnival operator favored the smaller, lighter, 'counter top' models because they could be easily transported. Carnival diggers during that era used cash currency and silver coin in the playfield as prizes. The early carnival diggers brought gambling to small town America. Chancing a penny or a nickel to win a Silver dollar coin made the carnival diggers very popular during the depression.

But in 1951 everything changed. A new Federal Law called the Johnson Interstate Transportation Act, classified all diggers as "Gambling Devices". This meant they could not be moved or sold across state lines, hence killing the market for the art deco diggers. Due to lobbying, a group of carnival digger operators was successful in having their diggers reclassified as "Amusement Devices" in 1953, but to be legal, this type of legal crane had no electric motors and no coin slots. Consequently, there were no more of the "Deco Era" cranes and diggers produced after 1951. As a result many diggers were modified from 1953 until the late 1970's to comply with Federal Law. This is why many diggers currently seen are found without electric motors, coin mechs, prize chutes, or locking cabinet backs. In the mid 1950s some other interesting diggers came about, such as Chicago Coin's Steam Shovel, Williams' Crane and Williams' Sidewalk Engineer. But these digger did not award any prizes, and were purely for amusement only.

Arcade Games.
For the lack of a better name, this is basically all games that don't fit into the above categories. This includes baseball pitch and bat, manikin and animation games, and bowling games (see my Baseball pitch & bat web page and Bowling Alley & Shuffle Alley web page for information on those). Also I include the helicopter games, jet and airplane driving games (though I guess you could call these "driving" games, but I don't), and other arcade weirdness. Finally, cranes and diggers that don't award prizes are also lumped into this category. Other arcade oddities include Gottlieb's 1940 Skee-Ball-Ette and Evans' 1940 Ski-Ball, where a manikin (or is that mannequin?) plays Skee-ball in a small pinball sized game. There are plenty of other manikin arcade games too that are quite fun, like Chicago Coin's 1949 Midget Skee Ball, Mutoscope's 1948 Silver Gloves, and and Williams' 1957 Ten Strike and 1965 Mini-Golf. As far as digger and cranes go, I personally like the 1950s versions like Williams' 1956 Crane (appropriately named!) and Chicago Coin's 1956 Steam Shovel (nearly identical games!) These two games are rather goofy, as the idea is to pick up as much sand or beads as possible in a given amount of time. No prize is won! (1930s cranes and diggers award prizes, and these are in their own section.)

The era of arcade games right before video games took over (pre-1977) are often the most fun. Technology of the time really made these games a unique blend of EM and solidstate. They still have the "EM charm", but they also have some flash of solidstate. The first generation of sound started as early as the 1950s, with Williams 1956 Peppy the Clown, a puppet that danced to music, and the player could control the puppet. This used a Proprietary cart endless loop 1/4" tape sound system. Later, the 1960s brought a short lived consumer format called PlayTape, which was the predecessor to 8-track. Then in late 1969, 8-track tape sound was used, and this is really the best sound quality and format for these EM games. Also the 8-track system allows more than one sound (channel) to be played at a time. So there could be an endless background sound with interactive foreground sound. The games with 8-track sound are really cool because the sound is quite good! After 1976 these 8-track games were no longer made, but really arcade games did not get sound as good as these 1969-1976 eight track games until the 1990s! (We were stuck with bad 8-bit computer generated sound until the 1990s and good compression, large memory and fast processors became common.)

For example, check out the 1974 Midway Chopper. It uses an 8-track tape player for the voice and sound, and it's quite funny and the sound is "real" (not computer generated) and of good quality. See the web page on it, as there is even a downloadable movie clip of Chopper, complete with sound. It is quite a challanging games too, and a neat mix of EM (Electro-Mechanical) and solidstate technologies. There are also some downloadable sound tracks taken from the 8-track players for games like Midway's Wild Kingdom (1971) and Haunted House (1972), thanks to Mark Clayton. Haunted House uses four channels of the 8-track sound. One for the background sounds, and three others which only turn on when specific targets in the game are hit (check out the "witch" sound track, which is hilarious).


Game Lists, Alphabetically by Game Type.

Arcade Games (Electro Mechanical):

  • 3D Art Parade aka 3D Dimensional Theatre, Mutoscope, 1950s (exact date unknown), came in either 5 or 10 "movie" systems. Basically a motorized timed slide show of sexy women. Used two slides, takes at slightly different angles, giving the viewer a very realistic 3-D effect!
  • Ace Bomber, International Mutoscope, 1941, four anti-aircraft batteries shoot at a moving airplane. Hits scored by proper coordination between guns and plane, 300 shots, 24" x 24" x 6 feet.
  • Air Attack, Sega, 1/72
  • Air Defense, International Mutoscope, 10/40, actually made by C.R. Kirk & Company and distributed by Mutoscope, same concept as Chicago Coin's Jet Pilot (5/59).
  • Air Fighter, Kasco, 1970.
  • Apollo 14, Chicago Coin, 1972.
  • Are You a Super Man?, Western Products, 8/41.
  • Around the World Trainer, Chicago Coin, 6/55, fly around the world. Round the World Trainer, In the 1950's commercial airlines had revolutionized global travel. It was possible to circle the globe if you could afford it. Chicago Coin allowed you to do it at a big discount with Around The World Trainer. You sit in a craft that resembles an aircraft cockpit, and upon insertion of a dime, attempted to fly the next illuminated city on the map of the world in front of you. Movement was accomplished by using an air compressor to tip the craft up and down and side to side. Careful maneuvering allowed the light beam coming out of the front of the craft to line up with the lit city.
  • Atomic Bomber, International Mutoscope, 8/46, came in a couple different versions using different backglasses.
  • Attack and Attack II, Sega, 1973, a tank driving game where the player controls a small remote tank.
  • Automatic Pool, Chicago Coin, 1950s (exact date unknown), coin operated bumper pool game, BG, Game.
  • Aviation Striker, Exhibit Supply, 6/28, a strength tester that moves an airplane up a pole from a patron's strike on the padded block.
  • Band Box, Chicago Coin, 1950 to 1952, aka "Strike up the band", deposit a coin and the curtains open and the animated manikin musicians play a tune, bandbox works with a jukebox.
  • Bank Pool, United, 4/64, a combination pool and bowling type shuffle alley. Williams also made a game called Bank Pool (#140, 1/56) which was a coin operated pool table.
  • Bag Puncher, Mills Novelty Co., date unknown, bagpuncher is a strength type boxing and punching game, very similar to Mill's earlier Punching Bag and Mutoscope's Punch a Bag / Deliver the Punch (1910) and Exhibit Supply's Punch the Bag (1941) and Sega's Punching Bag (1960s).
  • Bally Basket Ball, Bally, 1940, bally basketball game.
  • Bank-Ball, Bally, date unknown, a ski-ball type bowling game.
  • Barbell Lifter, Automatic Novelty Company, 1925, seen in the Mike Munves catalog during the 1950s as "the Striking Clock." Insert a penny and pull up on the barbell with either with a curling motion or with a shoulder pull.
  • Baseball Pool, Genco, 4/56, a pool/billards baseball game.
  • Basketball - Midway, Midway, 1964, domed basketball, holes line the concave court and players on opposite ends try to be the first to launch the ball out using a numbered series of push-buttons on their control panel,
  • Basketball - Sega, Sega, 1966, domed basketball.
  • Basketball - Taito, Taito, 1960s (exact date unknown), doomed basketball.
  • Basketball Champ, Chicago Coin, 1947, one player, balls automatically delivered to an offensive manikin basketball player which the player controls and uses to shoot for a basket. Also a defensive manikin that moves left and right in front of the player controlled offensive manikin.
  • Bicycle Trainer, Exhibit Supply, late 1941. Uses a Schwinn bicycle to test the players maximum speed.
  • Bike Race, Mike Munves, 1940s (exact date unknown).
  • Billiardette Table, Billiardette Table Mfg. Corp. (Baumann Manufacturing), 1934, Chicago IL, proportionate to a standard billiard table, with the six holes. A coin-op mini pool table.
  • Billiardette Table Home, Home Billiardette Table Mfg. Corp. (Baumann Manufacturing) 1931, Chicago IL, proportionate to a standard billiard table, with the eight holes. A coin-op mini pool table.
  • Billiards Practice, A.B.T. Manufacturing Corporation, late 1920s (exact date unknown), uses an ABT style gun to practice pool on a mini pool table which is 30" long, 18" wide, 11-1/2" tall.
  • Bimbo Baby, maker unknown, 1950s (exact date unknown), animated bimbo babies play to music.
  • Bimbo Three Ring Circus, United Billards Inc, 1981, a copy of Williams' Peppy the Clown (1956), designed for kids, Bimbo the clown talked and sang, moving his head from side to side, player could press buttons on the front console which controlled Bimbo 3 Ring Circus' arm and leg movement.
  • Black Magic, Rockola, 1939, dice machine.
  • Bones, Buckley Manufacturing Co. (Chicago IL), 1936-1937, a payout dice machine. Similar to the Bally Reliance dice payout machine.
  • Booz-Barometer, North Western Corp. (Morris Il), 1950s (exact date unknown), try and move a ring along a bent metal rod to test your sobriety, 18"x18"x4", battery operated.
  • Bowling Game, Exhibit Supply, 1939, spinning ball propelled down lane, similar to Bally's Bally Alley.
  • Boxing Machine, maker unknown, date unknown (1980s), a modern version of Mutoscope's K.O. Champ (1955).
  • Bull's Eye, Midway, 1972, a dart wall game, Bulls eye uses hand controllers.
  • Caille Electricity is Life, Caille Bros, 1900s (exact date unknown), lung tester and grip tester.
  • Caille Hygienic Exerciser, Caille Bros, 1900s (exact date unknown), lung tester.
  • Caille-O-Scope, Caille Bros, 1905, a movie viewer that was competition for Mutoscope's Movie Viewer.
  • Candid Camera, 1950s (exact date unknown), Exhibit Supply, basically a funhouse mirror in a camera shaped timed box.
  • Hollywood Candid Camera, 1950s (exact date unknown), Mike Munvees, Si Redd's version, basically a funhouse mirror in a camera shaped timed box.
  • Carnival, Midway, 1963.
  • Carousel Race, maker unknown, 1970s (exact date unknown), uses circuit board and Nixie tubes to show patron's bets on horses. Has a payout hopper and spins the horses around on a turntable.
  • Challenger, Gottlieb, 3/71, head-to-head pinball soccer game with two players at opposite ends of the playfield, simultaneous play, can not be played with one player. Each player has flipper buttons which control only those flippers facing the opponent. Ball enters play from between the flippers. Game has 8 flippers and vertically mounted score reels.
  • Champion Punching Bag, maker unknown, date unknown.
  • Championship Fast draw, Southland Engineering, 1964, when red "draw" light flashes, players fastdraw handguns and fire in a western style gun fight.
  • Chexx Hockey & Super Chexx Hockey, ICE, 1983 to present, domed mechanical hockey game. Also see the 1970s Sega game called Face-Off.
  • Chopper, Midway, 10/74, Midway's Chopper was much more advanced helicopter flying game than Whirly Bird, Helicopter Trainer and Sega's Helicopter. Mechanical aliens would move up and down. They were equipped with light sensors so that you could shoot them with your pulsating light beam. The light beam was pulsating all of the time. As a pilot’s skill improved, the targets and obstacles moved faster and faster. Electronic sound and 8-track player with erie music.
  • Computer Space, Nutting Associates, 1972, the first commercial video game. Very funky fiberglass cabinet, black and white monitor, kind of like "Asteroids" but without the asteroids.
  • Cowboy, Sega, 1974.
  • Crane, Williams, 2/56, game #144, often confused with Williams' 1955 Sidewalk Engineer (because of the sign on Crane that says, "Be a Sidewalk Engineer"), four buttons operate the steam shovel to scoop up as many beans as possible in a given amount of time. Game uses "Lentil" beans. Very similar to Chicago Coin's Steam Shovel (6/56).
  • Crown Sportsman, Taito, early 1970s (exact date unknown), strength tester.
  • Dan-Bo, Sega, 1970s, Danbo is similar to Sega Jumbo, same cabinet but the elephant is off the ground and must use the trunk's suction to grab the ball off the ground and place the ball in a net.
  • Dancing Fools, probably 1950s, maker unknown, two black puppets dance much like Williams' Peppy the Clown.
  • Darts, Williams, 1970, very similar to Williams' Ringer (1970) and Penny Pitch. Spin the disk on the right side to throw the darts towards the target. As it spins, the darts light up going across the score glass. It can land on the target for points.
  • Derby, Chicago Coin, 1952, four players. Use the plunger to shoot a pinball, trying to shoot for the highest point alley. Higher points make the player's horse go further. The first horse to the end wins. In case of a tie, the highest points total wins.
  • Derby Day, Sega, early 1970s (exact date unknown), electronic sound, horses race each other head to head, also a pachinko style game, timed 45 second game.
  • Derby Roll, United, 5/55, a "roll-down" game where a ball is rolled down the playfield and into the desired hole advancing a mechanical horse in the backbox.
  • Dive Bomber, Sega, 10/71.
  • Donkey Bray Lifter, Exhibit Supply, 1925, a back strength tester that the patron lifts a floor lever. If done strong enough, the donkey brays out a donkey sound.
  • Dotmation Williams Slot Machines, WMS, 1994-1999. Williams up'ed the ante by adding a 192x64 dot matrix display to their spinning reel slot machines.
  • Dozer, Americoin, 1970s (exact date unknown), much like Williams' Sidewalk Engineer (1956), bulldozer, 8-track tape player.
  • Drop Kick, International Mutoscope, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Duoscope viewer, Exhibit Supply, 1922.
  • El Alamein, Sega (SegaSA), 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Electricity Will Do It, Mills, 1900s (exact date unknown), electricity strength tester.
  • Echo Phone, I.J. Mfg Company, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • El Toro, Zamperla, year unknown (probably 1960s), strength tester, squeeze the bull's horns together to move the needle.
  • Evans' Races, H.C. Evans, 1946, Evans Races was a air drawn horse race betting game much like Paces Races.
  • F-114, Allied Leisure, 1975, a projector game where the player sits in a chair and moves around the F114 to shoot other planes. 8-track tape player for background sound.
  • Face-Off, Sega, 1970s (exact date unknown), faceoff is very similar to Chexx Hockey.
  • Face Place, Face Place LLC, recent. Face Place is a brand new coin operated photo booth with a bit of old time nostalgia. This photo booth takes black and white pictures in a strip of four photos
  • Fascination, Chicago Coin, year unknown, a ball popping type game.
  • Film-a-Scope, L.B. Klugh Company, 1940s (exact date unknown), peep show type viewer.
  • Fire Escape, ICE, 1984.
  • Fishing Well, International Mutoscope, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Fist Striker, Exhibit Supply, date unknown, a strength tester.
  • Five StarQ, Sega, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Flying Circus, PRW (Phonographic Ruffle & Walker), 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Flying Saucers, International Mutoscope, 7/50.
  • Flying Tiger, Chicago Coin, 1972, electronic sound.
  • Football Game, Chester-Pollard Amusement Company (NYC), 1/26, manikin football game, very large oak cabinet.
  • Foos Ball, CCM, date unknown, Chicago Coin coin operated foosball game.
  • FubBall Match, maker unknown, date unknown, German game similiar to the Chester Pollard Football game, but smaller and cuter. The "FubBall" is really German for Fussball.
  • Fun Phone, Bally, 1950s (exact date unknown), a phone with a tape player. After a coin is inserted, a story is played through the phone for the patron.
  • George Washington Scale, Caille Brothers (Detroit), 1900s, made for many years during the early 1900s.
  • Goal Tender, Midway, 1973, game #566.
  • Golden Arm, Midway, 6/69, a strength tester.
  • Golf Champ, Bally, 8/58, a real full size one hole coin operated mini putt-putt.
  • Golf Ball Vendor, Jennings and Mill, mid-1930s, both Mills and Jennings made slot machines that vended golf balls. Jennings and Mills golf ball vendors (as they were called, to avoid the 'golf ball slot machine' stigma) were made primarily during the mid 1930s (Jennings Sportman around 1937 and Mills Golf Ball Vendor around 1935).
  • Grand National Sweepstakes, Seeburg, 1936, Seeburg Grand National was made in the early 1930's when gambling on pinball games had become extremely popular. Seeburg wanted a piece of the action, so they made this cash payout horserace game. The player selected the number of the horse desired to bet on, then the circle of horses would spin, and if it stopped on that horse number, you won!
  • Grand National Race, Sega, 1972.
  • Grip Developer, Exhibit Supply, date unknown, a strength tester.
  • Gripmeter, American Gripmeter, 1947, arcade strength tester.
  • Grip Scale, Gottlieb, 1940, uses no electricity, a penny determines one's strength. Either squeeze the center pull bar, or push or pull the outer bars. If strong enough the bell will ring.
  • Grip Tease, maker unknown, date unknown.
  • Hat Blower, Mills Novelty, 1905, lung tester game where the patron blew into a tube and the harder they blew, the more hats would lift off the men's heads in the game. Comical men's names too like Howie Blewitt and August Wind. Also see the Mills Novelty Weight Blower.
  • Hawk Avenger, Bromley, 1991, an updated and fully electronic version of Midway's Chopper (1974) helicopter game.
  • Helicopter, Sega, 7/68, similar to Midway's helicopter game Whirly Bird (1969) and Amusement Engineering's Helicopter Trainer. 8-track player for background sound.
  • Helicopter Trainer, Amusement Engineering, 1968, helicopter flying game, similar to Midway's Whirly Bird (1969) and Sega's Helicopter (1968).
  • Heli-Shooter, Sega, 1977.
  • Hi-Ball, Exhibit Supply, 1939.
  • Hi-Score Pool, United, 1950s (exact date unknown), coin operated bumper pool game. Game.
  • Hockey Champ, Chicgo Coin, 11/68, two players.
  • Hole in One, Games Inc., 1957, upright arcade golf game.
  • Hollywood Candid Camera, 1950s (exact date unknown), Mike Munvees, Si Redd's version, basically a funhouse mirror in a camera shaped timed box.
  • Hollywood Driving Range, Williams, 1/65, one player, golf theme pitch and bat style game with manikin golfer. Backglass animation, similar to Williams' Apollo (1967) pinball game. Uses same manikin golfer as Mini Golf (9/64).
  • Hooligan Pool, Chicago Coin, circa 1951, coin operated bumper pool.
  • Hoot-Mon Golf, Superior Games, 1928, Hoot Mon golf is very similar to Chester Pollard Play Golf (1929).
  • Hoss-Shoes, Global Industries (Cheyenne Wyoming), 1960s (exact date unknown), horse shoes.
  • Hot Shot Basketball, Midway, 1993, a mini bar-style basketball arcade game.
  • How Can I Find The Right Love Mate, Exhibit Supply, 1941, sqeeze the handle and a light will stop and telling the answer for finding a mate. The answer categories are Horse Around, Be lovable, Practice Petting, Be on the Make, Advertise, Flirt, Spruce up, Feed'em, Blind Date, Woo to Win, Step Out.
  • Horse Shoes, Exhibit Supply, 1935, Horseshoes a dice game, but does not payout, more of a trade stimulator. But still a neat game, just not a pay out model.
  • Hurdle Hop, International Mutoscope, 1950s (exact date unknown, miniature bowling/skeeball game.
  • Hyroll, Bally, 1940s (date unknown), rolldown game.
  • Ice Cold Beer, 1983, Taito, Try and use the two joysticks to tip a motorized bar back and forth, maneuvering a ball up to a specific lit hole on the playfield. Similar to Zeeks Peak.
  • Imperial Shocker, Mills Novelty Co., 1908, battery operated shocking arcade machine.
  • Indian Dicer, Gottlieb, 1928 to 1932, a dice machine trade stimulator.
  • Ingo, United Distributing, 1950s (exact date unknown), a small battery operated (4 D cells) strength tester. A nickel is put in the handle, and it falls down to the base of the game (where the coin box resides.) Patron squeezes the handle to move the lights up as far as possible.
  • In the Barrel, Evans, 6/40, a manikin skee ball game similar to Ski-Ball (Evans 3/40).
  • Invaders, Midway, 12/70, game #546, a monster style gun game where the player shoots monsters with a joystick control, electronic sound.
  • Invaders, Sega, 1972.
  • Jaycopter, Jaycopters Recreation Ltd. (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), 1968. The object of the game is to fly the helicopter so it lands on each of three numbered heliport pads (in order) spaced around the playfield. As you progress through the three pads, trees start to come into play (one near the pad#2 and two surrounding pad#3). If you hit a tree and trigger it's contact, a "crash" light brightens on the control board and you have to go back and re-touch your last pad.
  • Jet Fighter, Williams, 11/54, game #115.
  • Jet Pilot, Chicago Coin, 5/59, same cabinet as Genco's Motorama (1957) and Space Age (1958), and a similiar style space flying game.
  • Jet Rocket, Sega, 8/70.
  • Jitters, Exhibit Supply, year unknown.
  • Jockey Club, Sega, same as Sega Derby Day, early 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Joker's Wild, Midway, 1960s (exact date unknown).
  • Jumbo, Sega, 1970. Similar to Dan-bo.
  • Junior Golf, Chester-Pollard Amusement Company (NYC), 10/29, manikin golf game countertop version.
  • Junkyard, Americoin, 1970s (exact date unknown), a digger/crane game where the player picks up diecast cars (the "junk") and tries to load them into the hopper. The more cars loaded, the more points. Uses an 8-track tape player for sound. A newer version of the older Williams Crane (1956) and Chicago Coin's Steam Shovel (1956).
  • Killer Shark, Sega, 1972, shark moves around and the player shoots it with a spear gun. It has a series of slides on a wheel that make the shark move and thrash around when shot. Same game as Sega's Sea Devil, but Sea Devil had a manta ray instead of a shark.
  • K.O. Champ, International Mutoscope, 9/55, KO Champ is a manikin boxing game under a dome.
  • Lift-O-Graph (Monkey Lift), International Mutoscope, 1938, a monkey strength tester where the patron tried to get the monkey up as high as possible on the pole.
  • Lite-A-Diamond, Bally, 6/59, game #609, one of the Bally "skill" series games.
  • Little Pro, Southland Engineering, 3/64, one player, a 9 hole par 3 manikin golf game. Designed by Harry Williams, low production, very similar to Williams' Mini Golf (9/64) as Williams bought the rights to Little Pro, but Little Pro has a much less attractive art.
  • Little Pro, Bromley, 1991, a 9 hole par 3 manikin golf game. A modern version of Southland Engineering's Little Pro (3/64) and Williams' Mini Golf (9/64).
  • Long Shot, Buckley, 1930s (exact date unknown), a payout horse race slot machine.
  • Latonia Derby, H.C. Evans, 1933, mechanical horse race payout game same as Saratoga Sweepstakes.
  • Lord's Prayer, International Mutoscope, 1950s (exact date unknown), a vendor good luck metal dispenser which gives the looks and sound it is making a engraved metal (but is actually just dispensing a pre-made token).
  • Liberator, Williams, 1946, Williams first coin op game was a conversion.
  • Lucky Penny Sweepstakes, Penny Amusements (Syracuse NY), 1968, a penny pitch style game.
  • Lucky 7, Genco, 1957, Genco Lucky7 is a rolldown equivalent of playing dice.
  • Lunar Rescue, Sega, 1973.
  • Magic-Ball, Bally, 2/38, a copy of Bally's Blow-Ball, a player controlled hair dryer type blower allows the player to move a ball into scoring holes.
  • Maneater, Project Support Engineering, 1975, Man Eater is an early black and white video game but in a very unique shark-shaped cabinet.
  • Massage-o-Matic, Genco, 1950s (exact date unknown), coin operated massage chair.
  • the Meadowlark, United Engineering, 1929, mechanical golf game. A small version of Chester Pollard Play Golf and Junior Golf. Meadow Lark has three hole golf course with a five stroke penalty lake hazard.
  • Mercury Athletic Scales Strength Tester, Mercury Steel Corp (Detroit), 1950s (exact date unknown), available in several variants from a counter top model to a floor model.
  • Metal Typer, Standard Metal Typer Inc, 1938 to 1980s, patron stamps letters on a metal disk.
  • Midget Movies, Capitol Projector Corp (NYC), 9/47, three different sized top frames were available from small to tall. Also reissued in 4/62 as "Midget Movie Theatre".
  • Midget Skee Ball, Chicago Coin, 1949, 1 player, manikin player skee bowl game, (also see the copy of this game, Satomi's Pitch Ball, 1972).
  • Mini-Bowl, Williams, 8/70, game #379, manikin bowler, reissue of Ten Strike and Ten Pins (12/57).
  • Mini Futbol, Sega, late 1960s (exact date unknown), a mechanical soccer type arcade game.
  • Mini Golf, Williams, 9/64, two players, 9 hole par 3 manikin golf game. Must shoot holes one to nine, in order, with a limited number of shots. The rights for this game were bought from Southland Engineering. Hence Mini Golf is very similar to their Little Pro (1964) game. Score reels only show strokes taken and hole number. A more pitch and bat style of this game was released in 1965 with Williams' Hollywood Driving Range game.
  • Miniature Mutuel Race Track, Evans, 1930s (exact date unknown), 42" race track much like Evans Portable Candy Race Track, but smaller.
  • Missile, Sega, 6/69. Very similar to Midway's SAMI.
  • Monkey band, Mike Munves, 1960s (exact date unknown). Has a continuous loop tape playing circus music and the animated monkeys play along. Adjustable timer plays music for 10 seconds to 2 minutes. German made machine sold by Mike Munves in NY.
  • Monkey Bizz, Allied Leisure, 1968, Allied Leisure's first game, player maneuvered a metal hook to try and pick up plastic monkeys at the bottom of a glass-enclosed playfield.
  • Monkey Jungle, Genco, 1950s (exact date unknown), similar to Genco's Two Player Basketball.
  • Monkey Shines, maker unknown, year unknown, two players shot a ball in a bagatelle type mini playfield, trying to advance their monkey up the pole. First one to the top wins.
  • Monkey Organ, Mike Munves, 1950s (exact date unknown), music plays and as the user cranks the wheel the monkey moves his head and bangs the symbols.
  • Moon Rocket, maker unknown, year unknown.
  • Movie Viewer, American Mutoscope & Biograph Co., 1895 to 1909 (American Mutoscope) & 1926-1950s (International Mutoscope), peep show movie viewer.
  • Mystery Score, Midway, 8/65, one player, monster theme pitch and bat.
  • Nudist Colony, Exhibit Supply, 1957, a colony of live ants living in a glass house.
  • Number Roll 21, Genco, 6/57, two player, a rolldown game where the player is trying to get "21" in each of the four frames. A bonus value is added to the player's score if they don't "bust."
  • Official Sweepstakes, Rockola, 1930s (exact date unknown), available as a gumball trade simulator, or without gumball vendor. Patron bets on rotating horses.
  • Old Time Basketball, Exidy, 1976, Exidy failed attempt to copy the classic 1947 Chicago Coin Basketball Champ. Only about 1000 of these were made, as they did not sell well (they had to compete with videos and pinballs).
  • Oomph, Western Products Company (Chicago), 1/40, countertop game.
  • Owl Lifter, Mills Novelty Co., circa 1904, known as the "Show Your Strength Owl Lifter" because of the owl head cast into the metal surround. "Let the strong man show you your strength".
  • Pacer, Evans, 1930s (exact date unknown), horses race under a glass dome.
  • Paces Races, Pace, 1931 to 1942, the first console slot machine where horses race under the top glass.
  • Panzer Attack, Midway, 11/74
  • Par Golf, Chicago Coin, 1965, one player, backbox animation. Has a manikin golfer next to the conventional "pitch and bat" style bat. Unfortunately the manikin is often broken (from pitched balls). Novelty version of Super Par Golf.
  • Pay Phone 5000, Williams, 1990s (exact date unknown), an intelligent pay phone system.
  • Peep Show Barrels, Exhibit Supply, 12/56, come on teaser entices viewer to insert coin to view.
  • Pee Wee "36 Lucky Play 4-in-1", maker unknown, 1930s (exact date unknown), a payout dice machine.
  • Penny Pitch, Williams, 1/73, game #412, very similar to Williams Ringer (1970) and Williams Darts (1970). With a sharp spin of the wheel watch the lit image of a coin fly through the air attempting to land it in the most desirable spot in the fountain.
  • Peppy the Clown, Williams, 4/56, game #146, uses a Proprietary 1/4" cart endless loop tape sound system, designed for kids, Peppy the clown talked and sang to calliope music, moving his head from side to side, player could press buttons on the front console which controlled Peppy’s arm and leg movement. Similar to United's Bimbo Three Ring Circus.
  • Perfume Lady vendor, Mills, 1900s. Drop a penny into the coin head and the clockwork mech starts which results in the spray of perfume onto a handkerchief.
  • Periscope, Crown (Taito), late 1960s, basically a similar game to Midway's Sea Raider.
  • Pike's Peak, Grostchen, 1939, a mechanical arcade game/trade simulator that dispenses gum balls, try and get the metal ball to the top of Pikes peak.
  • Pilot Wheel, Dale Engineering, 12/47, remote control P-51 Mustang figher plane.
  • Pinball Circus, Midway, 1994, an arcade amusement game with flippers by Williams, never produced in quantity.
  • Ping Pong, Exhibit Supply Company, 1938. ESCO ping pong. There is a ball lift on each end and as long as you keep scoring on your opponent you continue to serve. If a player hits the ball in the side-out traps on his side of the net, it will score for the opponent. Game is over when one player hits 11. There are small score reels for each player's score.
  • Play the Derby, Chester Pollard Amusement Company, 1929-1930, a two horse game where players turn a hand wheel to move their horse.
  • Play Football (or Play Soccer), Chester Pollard Amusement Company, 1924-1926, mechanical soccer game (marked as "football" outside the USA).
  • Play Golf, Chester-Pollard Amusement Company (NYC), 12/29, manikin golf game in large huge oak cabinet
  • Play HiLi, Hili corp, date unknown.
  • Play Hockey, International Mutoscope, 1940.
  • Poison this Rat, Groetchen, 5/42, a WW2 comical game with Hitler as the rat.
  • Poker Arena, Whichard Industries Inc., date unknown.
  • PopCorn Machines, coin operated Pop Corn machines by various manufacturers during the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s.
  • PopCorn Machines part 2, coin operated Pop Corn machine, the Biltmore Popperette popcorn machine.
  • Pop Up, Chicago Coin, 10/64, a ball popping turret type game.
  • Portable Candy Race Track, H.C. Evans, date unknown, the track turns by an operator and the horse closest to the finish line wins, and the patron gets some candy.
  • Pro-Bowler, Sega, 1972, two players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game. Sega Pro Bowler is very similar to Williams' Mini Bowl (8/70). Five foot playfield length.
  • Pro Basketball, Chicago Coin, 1961, upgraded version of Basketball Champ.
  • Pro Hockey, Chicago Coin, August 1961, two player hockey game.
  • Punching Bag, Mills Novelty Co., 1900, a boxing strength tester, very similar to Mill's Bag Puncher.
  • Punching Bag, Sega, 1960s (exact date unknown), a boxing strength tester.
  • Pursuiter, Sammy, 1970s (exact date unknown), a WW1 bi-plane shoots at an Austin Mini Cooper. Player 1 controls the plane up and down, the speed a tiny machine gun mounted on the plane that lights up every time the trigger is pulled. If the Player 2 button is pressed, this controls the speed of the Austin Mini Cooper by means of front floor mounted gas pedal. Try to out run the bi-plane to the tunnel or slow down to make the bi-plane pass the car.
  • Deliver the Punc / Punch a Bag, American Mutoscope & Biograph Co., 1910, dial on face registers force of the punch, a boxing strength tester.
  • Punch the Bag, Exhibit Supply, 1941, a boxing strength tester.
  • Quizzer, maker unknown, 1950s (exact date unknown), a trivia game with lights trivia cards. Game had 100s of questions, all realative to the 1950s.
  • Race Way, Midway, 9/63, two player pinball, auto racing pinball style game but with a racecar "running man" type unit, similar to Flying Turns (1964) and Winner (12/64), uses real "Dinky Toy" cars (one Ferrari, one Maserati) in the backbox.
  • Radar Rocket, International Mutoscope, 1940s (exact date unknown), similar cabinet to Mutoscope's Atomic Bomber. The object is to keep a rocket (pinpoint of light) moving on a radar screen and to hover over the game's cross hairs.
  • Ray's Track, Bally, 1930s (exact date unknown), Nine horses race down the track, with odds drum indicating the odds on the winning horse. Payout goes into a hidden drawer compartment. Named after Bally's founder Ray Maloney. Similar to the 1935 Paces Races.
  • Red Ball, Midway, 1958, a ball popping game where the player tried to get a redball into certain positions on a bingo style grid.
  • Red Baron, Sega (SegaSA), 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Ringer, Williams, 11/70, game #383, very similar to Williams Penny Pitch and Williams Darts (1970). Although very simple in design, this is a LOT of fun to play. One or two players can play. You spin the disk on the right side to throw the horseshoe towards the pit on the other side of the glass. As it spins, the horseshoe lights up going across the glass. It can land in the pit for one point, a leaner for two, or a ringer for three. You get seven shots per game, and if you get a ringer on the third or sixth (I think) shots, you get an extra toss. It is so simple and stupid, but it is fun.
  • Rock 'N Roll, International Mutoscope, 1956, Rock and Roll is a ball maze game.
  • Roll in the Barrel, O.D. Jennings, 6/40, a skee-ball bowling type game.
  • Round the World Trainer, Chicago Coin, 6/55, fly around the world. Round the World Trainer, In the 1950's commercial airlines had revolutionized global travel. It was possible to circle the globe if you could afford it. Chicago Coin allowed you to do it at a big discount with Around The World Trainer. You sit in a craft that resembles an aircraft cockpit, and upon insertion of a dime, attempted to fly the next illuminated city on the map of the world in front of you. Movement was accomplished by using an air compressor to tip the craft up and down and side to side. Careful maneuvering allowed the light beam coming out of the front of the craft to line up with the lit city.
  • S.A.M.I., Midway, 6/70, game #544, gun game that launches rockets with a joystick control, electronic sound. SAMI stands for Surface to Air Missile Interceptor.
  • The Safe, MCI, 6/74, game is time based (adjustable) where the player tries to spin the tumbler left and right and watch a meter for the correct number. If player gets the combination, they win a token which is dispensed inside the safe.
  • Saratoga Sweepstakes, H.C. Evans, 1933, a nickel is inserted and the Pick the Winner dial can be turned to the number of the horse choosen to win the race.
  • Score Pool, Williams, 5/56, game #153, coin operated pool game, BG, Game, Game.
  • Sea Devil, Midway, 11/70, game #545, electronic sound, a submarine game where the player looks through a periscope to shoot ships.
  • Sea Devil, Sega, 1972, same as Killer Shark (Sega 1972).
  • Sea Hunt, Allied Leisure, 1972, a shakerball game. A square cabinet with a pinball playfield and two handles. The playfield was designed where you could shake it, as the the playfield was movable. The playfield was free-floating.
  • Sea Raider, Midway, 1/70, game #543, electronic sound, a submarine game with the player looking through a periscope to shoot ships.
  • Sea Rescue, Midway, 10/71, game #551, skill game with dual joysticks, electronic sound generator and 8-track player sound loop.
  • Sea Wolf, Midway, 1976, electronic video game version of Sea Devil (1970), a submarine game where the player looks through a periscope to shoot ships on a black and white video monitor with a color overlay. Midway 8080 class CPU game (like Space Invaders).
  • See a View Houses, Exhibit Supply, 4/57, timed peep show device with topless ladies. Also sold as "Peeping Tom Headquarters" and "Life in a Brownstone Mansion".
  • Set Shot Basketball, Richman Corp. (sold by Munves), 4/52, two players. There are five or six ping pong balls that fall into holes. Each hole has a lever that you manually trigger to flick a paddle under the ball to shoot it towards the basket. Each basket is scored on the backboard scoreboard (lights).
  • Seven Lucky Monkeys band, Mike Munves 1960s (exact date unknown). Has a continuous loop tape playing circus music and the animated monkeys play along. Adjustable timer plays music for 10 seconds to 2 minutes. German made machine sold by Mike Munves in NY.
  • Show Your Strength, Mills Novelty Co., circa 1904, known as the "owl lifter strength tester" because of the owl head cast into the metal surround. "Let the strong man show you your strength".
  • Sidewalk Engineer, Williams, 4/55, game #126, a strange game that really is more of a toy. Player gets to control a remote controlled bulldozer around a big sandbox for 60 seconds. No scoring and no prizes!
  • Sigma uv1700 Slot Machines, Sigma, 1999-2005. Video slot machines by Sigma.
  • Silver Chest, Genco, 1953.
  • Skee Jump, Scientific Games (Brooklyn NY), 1/40, a skee-ball bowling type game.
  • Ski N Skore, Mike Munvees, 1960s (exact date unknown), a mechanical skiing game, ski through 80 games in under two minutes in the fastest time.
  • Skill-a-rette, Standard Coin Machine Co. (Chicago IL), 1930s (exact date unknown).
  • Skill Derby (standard and deluxe), Bally, 9/60, game #656, came in standard and deluxe versions, has a mechanical horse race on the top of the game.
  • Skill Roll, Bally, 3/58, The object is to drop a coin in the top slot and "flick" the handles to shoot it back and forth. The better you shoot, the higher points. Highest score is 460 based on the max points on the way to the bottom.
  • Skill Parade (standard and deluxe), Bally, 10/58, game #616, 500 total produced.
  • Skill Score, Bally, 4/60, game #653, 250 produced.
  • Silver Gloves, International Mutoscope, 1948, two players, manikin boxers fight each other (boxing), one control moves the fighter forward and back, the other control swings the fighter's arm, when a fighter is knocked out by a hit to the chin, the manikin actually falls down for the count, three knock outs and the other player wins.
  • Skee-Ball-Ette, Gottlieb, 1940, one player, skee ball style manikin game. Similar to Evan's Ski-Ball (1940).
  • Ski-Ball, H.C. Evans, 3/40, one player, manikin ski ball skee-ball game, similar to Gottlieb's Skee-Ball-Ette (1940).
  • Sky Pilot, Baker Novelty, 1941.
  • Smack a Jap Keep them Bombing, maker unknown, 1940s (exact date unknown).
  • Sonar, Sega, 1972, submarine game where you shot the subs and they break in half and explode. Must like the Sammy Sub Roc.
  • Sonic Fighter, Allied Leisure, 1971.
  • Soccer, Sega (Segasa), 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Space Ace, Cinematronics/Magicon, 10/83, laser disc video game.
  • Space Balls, Kasco, 1970, uses are 3/4 inch glow in the dark nylon balls in the blacklight lit play area. This game is basically a kicker catcher type of game where the spaceship is moved lift and right using a joystick to "catch" the "Space Balls".
  • Space Flight, Bally, 1969, rotating moon and black light gives the moon a 3-D look, like a helicopter game in which the player drops the lunar lander on a string into certain holes in the moon (which rotates).
  • Space Laser, Leisure-Tron (Ann Arbor MI), 1970, can be played as one player (verses the game) or head-to-head two player, uses a real laser as a ray-o-lite type device.
  • Spark Plug, Bally, 1934, player picks a winner, then presses a lever and the horses spin around.
  • Space Pilot, Williams, 11/68, game #364, fly the helicopter-like space rocket around in circles, trying to hit the target contacts with the metal rod on the bottom of the rocketship to score points. Very similar to Whirly Bird and Helicopter Trainer, but Space Pilot uses two propeller motors (vertical and horizontal) for up/down forward/back motion (unlike the helicopter games).
  • Spinner, Bally, 1962, game #697, catch colored balls with the highest value in your 5 holes to beat the other players before the timer runs out, center spinner turns and throws balls, 29" x 29" x 48".
  • Spooksville, Allied Leisure, 1972, a shakerball game, a square cabinet with a pinball playfield and two handles. The playfield was designed where you could shake it, as the the playfield was movable. The playfield was free-floating.
  • Spot Pool, Gottlieb, 1956, Gottlieb Spot-Pool was a coin operated bumper pool game.
  • Sportsman, Jennings, 1934-1936, a slot machine dressed up as a pinball machine. Manufacturer started in 1934, with the cabinet being redesigned in January 1935. The Jennings Sportsman appears to be a pinball machine with a ball shooter, pins on a playfield, and number values underneath the holes. But there is a slot machine lever on the side and a payout tray in the front.
  • Squoits (Fun with Water), Aquatic Products (Los Angeles), 5/57, a water polo gun game with a ping pong ball.
  • Star Five or Star V, Kasko, 1975, aka Star V or Star 5, mechanical projection star flying game.
  • Star Rocket, Chicago Coin, mid-1950s (exact date unknown), a ball popping game much like Williams 1959 gun games using balls (Vanguard, Crusader, Titan and Space Glider).
  • Steam Shovel, Chicago Coin, 6/56, game is played by inserting coin and moving 2 levers which operate the steam shovel to scoop up as much lentel beans as possible in a given amount of time. Similar to Williams' Crane (2/56).
  • Still Crazy, Williams, 1980s (exact date unknown), cool vertical flipper game.
  • Stunt Pilot, Midway, 3/71, game #548, electronic sound. A weird flying game that is unique.
  • Submarine, Mills, 1910, a lung strength tester. Most were destroyed because of the fear of Tuberculosis.
  • Submarine, Midway, 1979, probably the last EM arcade made by Midway.
  • Sub-Pack, Bally, 1970s (exact date unknown), Subpack submarine game.
  • Sub Roc, Sammy (Satomi), 1970s (exact date unknown), SubRoc is a submarine style gun game much like Sega Sonar.
  • Super Bomber, Evans, 7/41
  • Super Jet, Chicago Coin, 1950s (exact date unknown), CCM SuperJet is a kiddie ride.
  • Super Jet Fighter, Williams, 12/54, Williams SuperJet game #116.
  • Target Roll, Bally, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Target Zero, Bally, 12/70.
  • Ten Strike, Evans, 9/39 to 1/53, in several different variations, mechanical manikin bowling game. Rockola made a licensed copy called Ten Pins 1940 to 1941, Evans went out of business in 1955, and the manikin bowler idea was bought by Williams and used in their Ten Strike and Ten Pins.
  • Ten Strike, Williams, 12/57, two players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, match feature, replay version of Ten Pins (12/57), reissed in 1970 as Mini Bowl.
  • Ten Strike 6 Player, Williams, 12/57, six players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, a six player version. Available only in 7 foot ("jumbo") playfield length.
  • Ten Pins, Rockola, made from January 1940 to 1941, A licensed copy of Evans' Ten Strike.
  • Ten Pins, Williams, 12/57, two players, mechanically animated manikin bowling game, no match (novelty), reissed in 1970 as Mini Bowl.
  • 3D Movies, Capitol Projector Corporation (NYC), date unknown.
  • Thunderbolt, Mike Munves (NYC), 8/45, a WW2 revamp of Evans Ten Strike into a gun game.
  • Tiger Tail Puller, Exhibit Supply, 4/28, a stregth tester. Pull the tiger's tail and if you pull hard enough, the tiger "roars".
  • Tom Tom, P & S Machine Company, 1947, a pinball type skeeball game with a rotating barrel.
  • Touchdown*, Williams, 1965, game #307, a pitch and bat with a football theme. Has a football running man unit. Instead of "outs" (like baseball), "fumbles" are used (three fumbles end the game). If a 25 yard target is hit, a running man unit football player "runs" (to first base). One hundred yards (getting a running man unit player to run "home") scores one point (a touchdown) on the score reels. If all targets are hit (including two fumbles!) across the back of the playfield (there is a light on the backglass corresponding to each target), then an overtime period is awarded (three additional fumbles). Also a touchdown pocket with a bullseye target, a carry-over feature (spell T-O-U-C-H-D-O-W-N) for multiple replays, and a magnet under the playfield to randomly vary the pitching.
  • Two Player Basketball, Genco, 3/54, two players, 2 Player Basketball has player controlled manikin basketball players compete against each other, game comes three ways (novelty, deluxe, super).
  • Tungo the Clown, International Mutoscope, 1950s (exact date unknown), strength tester game.
  • TV Viewer, I.J. Mfg Company, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Undersea Raider, Bally, 2/46, periscope type submarine gun game.
  • Unscramble, Allied Leisure, 10/69, an early Trivia style game using 8mm film on an endless loop.
  • Vibrant Foot-Ease, Exhibit Supply, 1940s (exact date unknown), stand on the base and insert a coin and it vibrates giving a foot massage, 5'1" high.
  • Vibrator Muscle Builder, Exhibit Supply, 1930s (exact date unknown), also known as the Chin Machine. Player pulls himself up onto the rings, when their head touches the rubber mat at the top, a bell rings. At the same time player receives vibration through the arms and shoulders.
  • Victory Professional Basketball, Victor Vending Corporation, 5/50, a countertop basket ball game.
  • Violano-Virtuoso, Mills Novelty Co., 1907 to 1929, though not an arcade game, the Violano Virtuoso is a beautiful work of art, and is a player violin.
  • Voice-O-Graph, International Mutoscope, 1957, a record recording booth (similar to a photo booth) that lets the patron make an actual 6" record which could be played on any record player. Customer selectable output record for 45 or 78 RPM.
  • Weight Blower, Mills Novelty, 1905, lung tester game where the patron blew into a tube and caused weights in the cabinet to lift up. The weights rised in sequence and a very strong blow would lift all the weights. Also see the Mills Hat Blower.
  • Whatizit, Allied Leisure, 1972
  • Western Trails, Southland Engineering, 1960s, a kiddy horse ride where the horse moves along an 8 foot track. Very unique horse ride, does more than just "buck".
  • Whirly Bird, Midway, 4/69, game #601, electronic sound (optional 8-track player is a rumor). Fly a helicopter around circle. The helicopter is attached to a rod that pivots on top of a center pylon and a counter weight helps lift the helicopter. Player controls the helicopter's pitch and speed (Whirly Bird, Helicopter Trainer and Chopper all used a similar helicopter, motor and pitch control mechanism). The object of the game is to fly the helicopter so it touch one of several pins (located around the edges of the helicopter's circle of rotation) that were identified by a light with the helicopter's "wisker". After touching one pin, that would sequence to another pin. Whiskers on the helicopter passed a small current through the pin and the helicopter. When navigated and hit the correct pin, the player scored.
  • Whizz, Genco, 9/46.
  • Winner, Midway, 12/64, two player pitch & bat, racecar "running man" type unit, similar to Race Way (9/63) and Flying Turns (1964) pinball games, but Winner is a pitch & bat. Uses real "Dinky Toy" cars (one Ferrari, one Maserati) in the backbox.
  • World Cup Soccer, Bally, 1968, electro-mechanical soccer game, men move in tracks and turn to kick the ball.
  • Zeeks Peak, 1984, Taito, on Zeek's Peek try and use the two joysticks to tip a motorized bar back and forth, maneuvering a ball up to a specific lit hole on the playfield. Similar to Taito Ice Cold Beer.

Diggers/Cranes - Prize Winning (Electro Mechanical):
(Diggers that do not award a prize are in the Arcade section.)
Mutoscope Digger Ad.

  • Arcadian "Blue Streak", Exhibit Supply, 1939, a digger/crane game, named "Blue Streak" for the blue mirror background often found in the game.
  • Bartlett Nickel Digger, Williams Bartlett, 1926-1931, the original nickel carnival crane.
  • Bridge Transporter, Bonzini and Sopransi (France), 1936, digger turntable crane.
  • Century Digger Crane, Exhibit Supply, 1933, also known as the 20th (Twentieth) Century Digger", a smaller crane that likes to drop the prize before it can reach the payout chute.
  • Clutching Hand, Hawtin, 1938, unique round digger/crane.
  • Crystal Palace, Exhibit Supply, 1939.
  • Dredger, Exhibit Supply, 2/32.
  • Electric Traveling Crane, International Mutoscope, 1933.
  • Electro Hoist, Star Machine Manufacturing (NYC), 4/34, digger/crane device.
  • Erie Digger, Erie Manufacturing Corporation, 1924 to 1946, was a favorite of the early traveling operators and remained so up to, and even well past, the Johnson Interstate Transportation Act of 1951.
  • ESCO crane, Exhibit Supply, 1930s (exact date unknown), a digger/crane game. Though "ESCO" stands for Exhibit Supply Company, "ESCO" is on the front casting. This is probably another incarnation of their Blue Streak.
  • Imperial, Exhibit Supply, 1/36.
  • Iron Claw, Exhibit Supply, 6/28, a digger/crane game, known as "model G".
  • Junior Crane, International Mutoscope, 4/32.
  • The Magic Finger, International Mutoscope, 12/34.
  • Miniature Steam Shovel, Sheldon Dickerson Steven Mfg Company, 1926.
  • Monarch Merchandiser, Exhibit Supply, 1940, miniature steam shovel digger/crane.
  • Novelty Candy Vender, Exhibit Supply, 1930s (exact date unknown), a claw type digger/crane that always at minimum dispensed a piece of candy, basically a Rotary Merchandiser with a different front casing.
  • Novelty Merchantman, Exhibit Supply, 1934, "Miniature Steam Shovel" metal header on some models, a digger/crane game.
  • Pile Driver, Automatic Games (Englewood CA), 1933.
  • Red Top Crane, International Mutoscope, 1935.
  • Rotary Merchandiser, Exhibit Supply, 1930s (exact date unknown), a rotary pusher type digger/crane game.
  • Rotomatic Novelty Merchandiser, International Mutoscope, 1930s (exact date unknown), claw type digger.
  • S.S. Merchandiser, Mills Novelty Co., 5/34.
  • Super Sidebottom Crane, Sidebottom Novelty company, 1951.
  • Super Skill Diga, Sega, 1970s (exact year unknown).
  • Tirez, Bonzini and Sopransi (France), 1930s (exact date unknown), beautiful casting of a car on the top of the crane.
  • Treasure Island, Buckley, 1/35, a table top digger/crane.
  • Twentieth Century Digger Crane, Exhibit Supply, 1933, also known as the "Century Digger", a smaller crane that likes to drop the prize before it can reach the payout chute.
  • Yankee Traveling Crane, Stutz Machine Company, 8/33.

Driving Games (Electro Mechanical Car/Motorcycle):
(Other rocket/helicopter/bulldozer type driving games in the arcade section.)

  • American Indy, American Machine & Foundry (AMF), 1960s (exact date unknow), a coin operated slot car track much like Little Indy and Southland Engineering's Speedway (1963).
  • American Speedway, American Machine & Foundry Company, 1966, a very large coin operated 1/24 scale slot car track with a figure8. Cars do not crash though, due to a "traffic light" blocking system.
  • Around the World Trainer, Chicago Coin, 6/55, fly around the world. Round the World Trainer, In the 1950's commercial airlines had revolutionized global travel. It was possible to circle the globe if you could afford it. Chicago Coin allowed you to do it at a big discount with Around The World Trainer. You sit in a craft that resembles an aircraft cockpit, and upon insertion of a dime, attempted to fly the next illuminated city on the map of the world in front of you. Movement was accomplished by using an air compressor to tip the craft up and down and side to side. Careful maneuvering allowed the light beam coming out of the front of the craft to line up with the lit city.
  • Auto-Driver, Dale, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Auto Race, Chicago Coin, 12/74, two players, shot ball to advance car around track, 8-track tape player sound. Chicago Coin also made an identical game called Turf Club that was a horse theme.
  • Auto-Test, Capitol Projector Corporation, 10/59, Auto Test is a motion picture coin operated driving training game.
  • Chopper, Allied Leisure, 1974, essentially the same game as Allied Leisure Super Shifter.
  • Cross Country Auto Race, Keeney Mfg, 11/56.
  • Cross Country Race, International Mutoscope, 10/48, two player.
  • Cross Country Racer, All-Tech Industries, early 1960s (exact date unknown), sort of a kiddie ride combined with a Mutoscope Drive Yourself, tape player for sound.
  • Cruiser Pilot, Capitol Projector, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Cycle Rider, Taito, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Daytona 500, Allied Leasure, late 1960s or early 1970s (exact year unknown).
  • Dime-A-Drive Auto Trainer, manufacturer unknown, late 1950s (exact date unknown), sit down driving game complete with tailfins.
  • Dodgem Crazy, Sega, 1970, roll over cars by ramming it, thus scoring points. Has a cracker chute in the back board which acts as a speaker outlet for the eight track tape player. Same cabinet as the 1970 Sega Stunt Car.
  • Drag Races, Allied Leisure, 6/71.
  • Drive Master, Chicago Coin, 4/69, Drivemaster uses "playtape" sound.
  • Drive Mobile, International Mutoscope, 3/41, try and drive the Drive-Mobile across the map of the highways of the United States. Stay on course, of the driving progress is delayed.
  • The Driver, Kasko, 1970s (exact date unknown), uses 16mm film as the background.
  • Drivemobile, Sega, late 1960s (exact date unknown).
  • Drive Yourself Road Test (Drivemobile), International Mutoscope, 6/54, while you sit on the seat and steer, the seat moves in the direction turned. The object is the stay on the road to get more points. Similar to Williams 1962 Road Racer, it has a rotating barrel with the road on it.
  • Dune Buggy, Midway, 2/72, inside the cabinet is large flat course. The dune buggy is attached to a boom and the player manuvers about the course against time while scoring points for clearing obstacles.
  • Eighteen Wheeler, Midway, 7/79, an EM game even though introduced in 1979, 18 Wheeler.
  • F-114, Allied Leisure, 1975, a projector game where the player sits in a chair and moves around to shoot other planes.
  • Flying Turns, Midway, 1964, two player pinball, auto racing pinball style game but with a racecar "running man" type unit, similar to Race Way* (9/63) and Winner (12/64), uses real "Dinky Toy" cars (one Ferrari, one Maserati) in the backbox.
  • Fonz, Sega, 1976, actually a video game, same as Sega's Moto-Cross.
  • Grand Prix, Sega, 8/69
  • Grand Prix, Dukane Corporation, 1960s (exact date unknown.)
  • Hill Climb, Bally, 4/72, the game has a tiny motorcycle with a working motor, complete with chain drive. Twist the game's handle bar throttle and the motorcycle's motor spins, which in turn cause the drum mounted hill scenery to advance towards the player. Add too much power and the cycle pops a wheelie resulting in lost time and points. Complete several laps to enter the black lit night mode.
  • Hiway Patrol, All-Tech Industries (Florida), date unknown, Hi-way patrol is sort of a kiddie ride with an adult steering wheel and a drum type driving mechanism characterizing a cop chasing a speeding bad guy car down the highway.
  • Indy 500, Kasco, 1969, very similar to CCM's Speedway (1969), uses a rear projection system with a glass spinning disc and photo-optic cars. Many folks (in the USA and Canada) are familiar with the Chicago Coin Speedway version of this game. KASCO sold 1000s of these games around the world and but Chicago Coin bought the license for North America.
  • Jet Rider, Midway, 1/71, game #547, electronic sound.
  • Junior Auto Test, Capitol Projector, 1950s (exact date unknown). A driving game much like Capitol Projector's Auto Test, but in a smaller footprint.
  • Little Indy, American Machine & Foundry (AMF), 1960s (exact date unknown), one player, an oval coin operated slot car track, similar to American Indy and Southland Engineering's 1963 Speedway and Time Trials.
  • Midget Autos, Pace, 1941, based on Paces Races, but instead of horses uses cars. Four player game, where the player must turn a small crank handle to advance their car. Turn too fast and a clutch activates and resets the car to the beginning of the track. Turn too slow and obviously you lose the race.
  • Mike Munves Slot Car tracks, Mike Munves Corporation, 1960s (exact date unknown.) During the 1960s Mike Munves got into the slot car craze that was going around the U.S., and offered large "plug and play" slot car tracks.
  • Monte Carlo, Allied Leisure, 1973.
  • Monte Carlo, Sega, 1971, Black lighted 1/32 scale car driving on a vertical belt with mirrors.
  • Moto Champ, Sega, 1973, MotoChamp has several small motorcycles on the playfield. The object is to take your player controlled motorcycle to the other end of the playfield. But while this is happening, the other game controlled motorcycles impede your progress.
  • Moto-Cross, Sega, 1976, actually a video game, same as Sega's Fonz.
  • MotoPolo, Sega, 1968, Moto polo's two players each control a small foam motorcycle and push around a ping pong ball trying to score on the other's goal, 8 track player makes motorcycle noises.
  • Motorama, Genco, 10/57, you steer a car, and have a lever for forward and reverse. The object is to steer onto the different targets, ramps, etc, to work your way across the USA from NY to LA.
  • Motorcycle, Chicago Coin, 10/70, white cabinet sides. A second version was also released in 1974 with orange cabinet sides and an updated more realistic looking top marquee sign and an optional 8-track tape player.
  • Night Rider, Sega, 8/70
  • Pass, Taito, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Race Way, Midway, 9/63, two player pinball, auto racing pinball style game but with a racecar "running man" type unit, similar to Flying Turns (1964) and Winner (12/64), uses real "Dinky Toy" cars (one Ferrari, one Maserati) in the backbox.
  • Roadracer, Dale, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Road Race, Sega, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Road Racer, Williams, 3/62, game #264, there is a barrel that rotates within the machine with a road on it. The center of the road has metal contacts points every inch or so. The object is to keep the car on the road (and the car has a metal contact on the bottom of it) by steering the full-size steering wheel on the machine. It has a LOUD bell that rings when you score points by completing the circuit with the two contact points.
  • Road Runner, Bally, 8/71, holographic car racing.
  • Sand Buggy, Sega, 1972, electronic sound, 8-track player, drive over sand dunes and hazzards, cover as much distance as possible in the time allowed, similar cabinet as Sega's Stunt Car (1970).
  • Select-a-Train, Williams, 1955. A strange game that really is more of a toy. Player can manage one or two H.O. scale trains, and prevent crashes. Player controls train speed, and go through tunnels and bridges. A block system is part of the machine which prevents train crashes.
  • Sidewalk Engineer, Williams, 4/55, game #126, a strange game that really is more of a toy. Player gets to control a remote controlled bulldozer around a big sandbox for 60 seconds. No scoring and no prizes!
  • Space Age, Genco, 4/58, great space graphics, similar to Genco's Motorama (1957) but with a space theme.
  • Speed King, Chicago Coin, 1970.
  • Speed Shift, Chicago Coin, 6/74.
  • Speedway, Southland Engineering, 9/63, two players, two small slot cars race around a figure-8 style slot car track inside a pinball cabinet. Similar to Southland Engineering's Time Trials (6/63) and AMF's Little Indy and American Indy.
  • Speedway, Chicago Coin, 9/69, electronic sound, very similar to Motorcyle (CCM, 1970/1974) and Indy 500 (Kasco 1969).
  • Street Burner, Allied Leisure, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Spin Out, Allied Leisure, 11/71, Spin-Out uses a projection unit.
  • Stunt Car, Sega, 8/70, Formica sides with great car graphics. Steer the car back and forth across the front of the playfield, and the car is equipped with a bumper that acts as a flipper to hit the ball up the playfield. The object is to hit the ball into the different numbered holes, which then light up on the backglass. Here's the kicker, if you end up "winning," the machine dispenses, in this case, a small packet of crackers (although, who knows how long these crackers have been in this machine!)
  • Super Road7, Taito, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Super Shifter, Allied Leisure, 1974
  • Super Speedway, Chicago Coin, 7/71
  • Tank, International Mutoscope, 1943, a revamp of Mutoscope's Drive Mobile (3/41).
  • Tank, Sammy, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Time Trials, Southland Engineering, 6/63, two players, two small slot cars race around a figure-8 style slot car track, similar to Southland Engineering's Speedway (6/63) and AMF's Little Indy.
  • Tokyo Raider, International Mutoscope, 1943, a revamp of Mutoscope's Drive Mobile (3/41).
  • Turbo Drive, ICE, 1980s (exact date unknown), a slot car track under a plastic dome.
  • Turf Club, Chicago Coin, 1974, two players, shot ball to advance horses around track, 8-track tape player sound. Chicago Coin also made an identical game called Auto Race that was a car theme.
  • Untouchable, Kasco, 1974, a Japanese company (similar to Sega) EM game where you drive a 1930s style cop car and chase and shoot at a car of gangsters.
  • Wild Cycle, Allied Leisure, 6/70, motorcycle driving game.
  • Winner, Midway, 12/64, two player pitch & bat, auto racing style game but with a racecar "running man" type unit, similar to Race Way (9/63) and Flying Turns (1964), uses real "Dinky Toy" cars (one Ferrari, one Maserati) in the backbox.

Fortune Tellers:

  • Air Mail Letter - Air Drop, Exhibit Supply, 1944, card vendor.
  • Aladdin's Lamp, Exhibit Supply, 1940s (exact date unknown), Aladdins Lamp is a token vending fortune teller.
  • Ask Grandma fortune teller, Deca, 5/54, full size Grandma, life size with human moves (chest, both hands, eyes, head), the crystal ball glows once coin is inserted. She will scan the cards for a peek into your future, and then a fortune card will drop for the player. A copy of the Mike Munves Grandmother's Predictions (which was a copy of the 1932 Mutoscope Grandmother's Predictions). Note reproductions of "Grandma" have been made since the 1970s.
  • Ask Grandma fortune teller, Deca, 1950s, another Grandma fortune teller copy.
  • Ask Swami Napkin Holder Fortune Teller, F.E. Erickson Company, 1950s (exact date unknown), dispenses a fortune card. This fortune teller is often said to be "the one from the Twilight Zone TV episode with William Shatner".
  • Astrodata, Sega, 1971, fortune teller.
  • Astroscope fortune teller, Crabb Manufacturing Co., 8/38, arm does not move.
  • Astroscope fortune teller (new model), Crabb Manufacturing Co., 8/39, the wizard inside the reverse painted glass (three dimentional made of wood or cardboard) moves his arm, constantly pointing to the coin entrance. The lights flash and the player moves the right side dial indicator to pick his birthday, and the center indicator picks the month by zodiac sign. A package is delivered to the player that contains two sheets (folded 8.5" x 11") with zodiac and birthday information.
  • Buddah Fortune Teller, maker unknown, 1930s (exact year unknown).
  • Career Pilot, International Mutoscope, 1938, a personality tester, much like Mutoscope's Love Pilot.
  • Cleveland Grandma fortune teller, 1929-1932 William Gent Vending Company and later International Mutoscope. aka Cleveland Grandma or Cleveland Grandmother.
  • Crystal Gazer, Ad Lee Company (Chicago), 2/32, fortune teller, also came in an electric version released 10/38.
  • Crystal Gazer, Future Products, 1931, fortune teller and gumball machine, the equivalent to a penny operated magic 8-ball.
  • Donkey in the Gold Mine, maker unknown, date unknown, coin dispensing fortune teller, remade in the 1980s.
  • Donkey Wonder, Roovers Brothers (Brooklyn NY), 1891 and electrified in 1910, newer reproductions have also be made. The donkey turns its head, lifts the rod in her right hand, chatters her little lips, moves her ears, checks you with her "eye piece" and then spins the ship's wheel which rotates rapidly until it slows down and stops on a number. Player reads fortune from the two sheets on her sides as it correspondes to the number on the ship's wheel. Total of 24 fortunes. See a very similar fortune teller, Elephant Wonder.
  • Egyptian Seeress Fortune Teller, maker unknown, year known.
  • Elephant Wonder, Roovers Brothers (Brooklyn NY), exact date unknown, also see a very similar fortune teller, Donkey Wonder.
  • Fortune Theater, Admiral Vending (Chicago), 1961, Fortune Theatre has interchangable live action puppets, over 100 different puppets available (including Elvis!), 30 second play for five cents, runs on batteries yet coin operated,
  • Future fortune teller, maker unknown, year unknown.
  • Glorified Glamour Girls Card Vendor, International Mutoscope, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Grandma Predicts fortune teller, Mike Munves, 1950s (exact date unknown), one hand moves over the cards and other other hand moves over the cyrstal ball, head goes from side to side, eyes move, and the chest "breathes", crystal ball glows as the machine dispenses a fortune card. Your future is told!
  • Grandma's Prophesies fortune teller, Mike Munves, 1950s (exact date unknown), one hand moves over the cards and other other hand moves over the cyrstal ball, head goes from side to side, eyes move, and the chest "breathes", crystal ball glows as the machine dispenses a fortune card.
  • Grandmothers Predictions fortune teller, William Gent Vending Company and later International Mutoscope. aka Cleveland Grandma or Cleveland Grandmother. Grandmother's head moves left and right and nods up and down, her hand moves over the cards, her chest moves like she is breathing, and she of course gives out a fortune card. Again, many reproductions of this famous style fortune teller have available since the 1970s.
  • Gypsy Card Reader fortune teller, Crabb Manufacturing Co., 1940.
  • Gypsy Grandma fortune teller, Genco, 5/57, a small fortune teller with sophisticated movements (nods, turns her head, breathes). She picks-up the card from the enclosure that she opens with her left hand. After dropping the card into the caldron (which delivers it to the patron), she waves her hand.
  • Gypsy Palmist fortune teller, Exhibit Supply, 1930s (exact date unknown), insert a coin and place your hand on the palm reader plate. Pull the handle and fell beads moving under your hand, reading your fortune, then a fortune card is dispensed.
  • Horoscope Grandma fortune teller, Genco, 5/57, a dime for the horoscope and a nickle for the fortune. When you insert a coin the Grandma moves her head, moves both hands, and breathes and the hoppers inside spin until the right scroll is delivered into the tray out front. In the game pictured below the cabinet is original. The front grill is unpainted and the multicolored sparkles are present. Grandma's dress is original. The Horoscope plastic insert is a reproduction. The Canopy top is a reproduction transulscent plastic vaccum formed copy just as the original. The two front brass poles that attach the top to the base of the fortune teller are original as are three of the plastic-ceramic balls that sit on top. The two back balls are reproductions. The front glass also is a reproduction.
  • Horoscope Magic Buddah Fortune Teller, maker unknown, 1960s (exact year unknown).
  • Khayyan the Mystic fortune teller, Exhibit Supply, 11/49.
  • Kiss-O-Meter, Exhibit Supply, circa 1940, squeeze the handle and measure the thrill of your kisses.
  • Kissin Kupids, Amuse Vend Industries, 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Love Pilot, International Mutoscope, 1938, a personality tester, much like Mutoscope's Career Pilot.
  • Love Teller, International Mutoscope, 1/38, a personality tester.
  • Love Tester, Exhibit Supply, 1930s (exact date unknown). Reissued several times during the 1950s and 1970s. The "classic" love tester most people remember. Exhibit Supply also made some later Love Testers with less oak and more painted wood in the 1940s.
  • Love Tester, Mike Munves, 1970s (exact date unknown)
  • Love Tester, Sega, 1972.
  • Madam Isis, maker unknown, year unknown.
  • Madam X, F.E. Erikson (California), 1950s (exact date unknown), a restaurant napkin dispenser and fortune teller. Much like Ask Swami napkin dispenser, but with a slightly racer theme.
  • Madame Zita, Roover Brothers of Brooklyn (New York), 1895 to 1904.
  • Magic Eye, ABT, late 1930s (exact date unknown), press your hand down and it lights the screen with your fortune, then it cuts off that piece of the film and vends it to you out the front.
  • Magic Heart, Exhibit Supply, date unknown, a love fortune teller.
  • Magic Pen, Exhibit Supply, 1930s (exact date unknown).
  • Magic Mirror, Exhibit Supply, 1950s (exact date unknown), a sourvenir piece fortune horoscope is dispensed. Not to be confused with the 1928 countertop Magic Mirror fortune teller by Beejay Products.
  • Munves Grandmothers Predictions fortune teller, Mike Munves, exact date unknown, basically a copy of the 1932 Mutoscope Grandmother's Predictions, but cabinet later redesigned with rounded corners for Munves later Ask Grandma.
  • Mills 1908 Talking Fortune Teller, Mills Novelties, 1908. This was a high end machine made by Mills that actually talked. It used two cylinder style wax record players for the speech. A very unique fortune teller.
  • Munves Grandmothers fortune teller, Mike Munves, 1950s (exact date unknown), another Munves futune teller that probably competed with Genco's Gypsy Grandma fortune teller (1957).
  • Mystic Eye fortune teller, Exhibit Supply, 1/42.
  • Mystic Pen, Mike Munves, 1940s (exact date unknown), aka a 1950s repaint of Exhibit Supply Wizard's Pen, palm reader fortune teller. Put a nickel in the Wizards Pen coin push slide and place your hand on the top casting, the pen inside jumps around as if writing a personal message to you. When finished Wizard Pen vends out what appears to be a hand written card with a reading of your palm. But in reality the card are pre-printed.
  • Mystic Ray, maker unknown, 1930s (exact date unknown).
  • Mystic Mirror, International Mutoscope, 1920s (exact date unknown), fortune teller.
  • Mystic Swami fortune teller, International Mutoscope, 12/54.
  • Princess Doraldina fortune teller, Doraldina Corporations (Rochester NY), 1928, her chest moves as she breathes, and her eyes roll as she delivers a fortune.
  • Puss In Boots, Roover Brothers of Brooklyn (New York), 1897 to 1904, a cat fortune teller, remade in the 1980s.
  • Ramasees Egyptian, Exhibit Supply, circa 1940, mysterious mummy casket, player sets indicator to a question and deposits coin, startling full size skeleton head of Ramasees lights up and nods yes or no to answer the question.
  • Serena's Prophecies, Robert Strauss, 1970s (exact date unknown), Robert Strauss was Steve Gronowski's Chicagoland Slot Machine show partner for many years. Steve made this machine just like the "old time" fortune tellers of the 1930s. Cabinet is solid oak and used heavy duty gears and motors to animate Serena. Her head moves left and right, chest moves as she breathes, right hand moves over the card and left hand moves over the crystal ball, and then dispenses a fortune card.
  • Sex Appeal, Exhibit Supply, 1944, a love tester where the lights go round and round, stopping randomly.
  • the Sheik, Ahren, 1930s (exact date unknown). The Sheik machine started out as Ahren's Human Analyst machines. Drop a coin in the male or female coin slot and see the Sheik move back and forth. His quill pen appears to write a fortune, then a fortune card (written in longhand) is dispensed.
  • Sibille the Queen of Hearts, Mills Novelty, 1920s (exact date unknown), fortune teller.
  • Smiling Sam Lucky Piece, Exhibit Supply Co. (Chicago IL), 1939, really a vendor and not a fortune teller. Also known and labeled as "Smiling Sam the Voo Doo Man" (Smiling Sam Voodoo man). Has animated figure with moving eyes and mouth. The Uncle Remus Type figure changes expressions from deep sadness to elation before giving a lucky piece. Also sold as the "Blue Bird of Happiness" lucky piece vendor with a flapping wing blue bird instead of Smiling Sam.
  • Three Questions, Exhibit Supply, 1940, 3 Questions Monkey fortune teller, same as the Three Wheels of Love.
  • Three Wheels of Love, Exhibit Supply, 1940, fortune teller, same as the Three Questions fortune teller.
  • Vacuumatic Card Vendor, Exhibit Supply, 1950s (exact date unknown), really a fortune teller, this machine dispenses a card with the photograph of the patron's future partner and their kids, or a fortune type "loser" certificate card using a vacum system.
  • Wizard Fortune Teller, Mills Novelty Co., 11/26, metal table top fortune teller with a rotating paper disk that shows the patron's fortune.
  • Wheel of Love, Mike Munves, 1970s (exact date unknown)
  • Wizard's Pen, Exhibit Supply, 1940s (exact date unknown), palm reader fortune teller. Put a nickel in the Wizards Pen coin push slide and place your hand on the top casting, the pen inside jumps around as if writing a personal message to you. When finished the Wizard Pen vends out what appears to be a hand written card with a reading of your palm. But in reality the card are pre-printed.
  • Your New Solar Forecast Horoscope Monthly, Peerless Vending, date unknown.
  • Zelda the Mysterious fortune teller, International Mutoscope, 4/55, often confused as a Mike Munves fortune teller, Zelda was actually made by Mutoscope. Zelda's eyes blink, her chest breathes, and her hand moves over the cards, and then she dispenses the patron's fortune on a card.
  • Zodi Fortune teller, maker unknow, date unknown.
  • Zoltan fortune teller, Prophetron, 8/69, he does not move, but ball does light up and glow as fortune is read using a patron held phone, proprietary cart tape sound system. The name "Zoltan" was used and slightly modified to "Zoltar Speaks" for a fortune teller used in the 1988 Tom Hanks movie "Big" (though the fortune tellers "Zoltan" and "Zoltar" are nothing alike in looks or operation, this is often confused).
  • Zoltar Speaks fortune teller, zoltarmachine.com, NEW, trying to take advantage of the Zoltar name as used in the movie "Big", this recently made fortune teller uses the "zoltar" name. (Has nothing to do with the movie however.) Dispenses fortune tickets and has mechanical animation (moving eyes, jaw, arm, head). Also speaks with 16 different phrases and the crystal ball lights.

Gun and Rifle Games (Electro Mechanical):
(Only games with actual guns - other shoot 'em type games in the Arcade section.)

  • A.B.T. Target Skill, A.B.T. Manufacturing Corp., 1928 to 1961, a countertop trade stimulator gun game.
  • Ace, MCI, 1970s (exact date unknown), came in two cabinet style (large and larger), project style WW2 gun game.
  • Ace Bomber, International Mutoscope, 1941, four anti-aircraft batteries shoot at a moving airplane. Hits scored by proper coordination between guns and plane, 300 shots, 24" x 24" x 6 feet.
  • Air Raider, Keeney, 10/40, big sized projection screen gun game with an impressive 1930s machine gun.
  • Ace Machine Gun, Chicago Coin, 1/68, an updated version of CCM's Texas Ranger (1963).
  • Ambush, Williams, 1/73, game #396, solidstate sound, blacklight.
  • Anti-Aircraft Machine Gun, Keeney Mfg, 7/39, uses a projection screen.
  • Apollo Moon Shot Rifle Range, Chicago Coin, 1/69, electronic sound.
  • Aqua Gun, Williams, 2/68, game #353, electronic sound.
  • Arizona, T.H. Bergman & Company (Germany), early 1960s (exact date unknown), distributed by Duncan Sales Company (Cleveland), a gun game that shoots actual metal pellets!
  • Arctic Gun, Williams, 1967, black light.
  • Automatic Pistol Range, Exhibit Supply, 1920s (exact date unknown), two player gun game.
  • Bag A Bunny, Coin Machine Service, 1950s (exact date unknown), Bag-a-Bunny is a light ray style gun game conversion kit for Seeburg Shoot the Bear.
  • Balloon Gun, Sega, 1974, twin guns.
  • Bang-O-Rama, International Mutoscope, 4/57, 45 caliber handgun gun game.
  • Battle King, maker unknown, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Battle of Mars, Dale Engineering, 12/47.
  • Battle Station, Allied Leisure, date unknown.
  • Bazooka, Midway, 6/60, actually shoots a ball.
  • Big Game Hunter, A.B.T., 1946.
  • Big Top Rifle Gallery, Genco, 6/54.
  • Big Top Twin Rifle Gallery, Chicago Coin, 1973, dual gun game, 8-track tape player.
  • Birds, Keeney, 1/37.
  • Bonanza, Williams, 6/70, game #384, electronic sound.
  • Bonus Gun, United, 1/55.
  • Border Line, Taito, 1970s (exact date unknown), BorderLine shoot down circling bi-planes which crash into a landscape scoring points in the process. Has a twin handled machine gun mounted on the front.
  • Bull's Eye Ray-Gun, Bally, 11/39, a light ray gun game.
  • Bull's Eye, Bally, 4/55, kiddie size gun game.
  • Bullet Mark, Sega, 1970s (exact date unknown), twin guns.
  • Bunny Shooter, Hawtin, 1931, unique gun game in a digger style wood cabinet.
  • Burp Gun (cops & robbers), Dale Engineering, 7/57.
  • Caliber, Taito, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Captain Kid Gun, Midway, 9/66.
  • Carnival Gun, United, 11/54.
  • Carnival Rifle Range, Chicago Coin, 5/68.
  • Champion Rifle Range, Chicago Coin, 2/62, CCM/CDI, same game as Rocket Rifle Range. Shoot a pinball off a metal rack, and it drops onto a pinball playfield. Shoot the pop bumpers to increase their value.
  • Cops & Robbers (Burp Gun), Dale Engineering, 7/57.
  • Championship Fast draw, Southland Engineering, 1964, when red "draw" light flashes, players fastdraw handguns and fire in a western style gun fight.
  • Chicken Sam, Seeburg, 1939, a two-part (target unit and pedestal) light activation gun game known as the Ray-o-lite (Rayolite/Rayolight) G-1 (G1) gun. A light gun style game with a target cabinet and a separate gun cabinet.
  • Circus Rifle Gallery, Genco, 3/57.
  • Circus Target, Exhibit Supply, 12/53, shoots ping pong balls.
  • Clay Champ, Allied Leisure, 1979, dual rifle game.
  • Clay Shooting, Kasco, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Combat, Sega, 4/70, tank shooting game where player turns a mechanical tank and shoots at five back-lit targets for a total of 12 shots.
  • Commando Machine Gun, Chicago Coin, 1958, self contained electrically operated coin operated machine guns, large and comes in banks of three to fifteen guns, shoots steel balls, adjustable from 130 to 525 shots per play, gun is really big, large shooting gallery type device.
  • Commando Machine Gun, Chicago Coin, 1973, electronic sound.
  • Coney Island Rifle, Chicago Coin, 7/76, released as a pair with CCM's 1976 Shoot Out. 8-track tape player for background sound.
  • Convoy, Bally, 6/40.
  • Coon Hunt, Seeburg, 2/54, a two-part (target unit and pedestal) light activation gun game. A light gun style game with a target cabinet and a separate gun cabinet. Much like the earlier Seeburg Shoot the Bear (1947).
  • Crack Shot, Evans, 1930s (exact date unknown), sort of a console ABT style gun game.
  • Crack Shot, Allied Leisure, 12/72, two players and two guns, Crackshot has solidstate sound.
  • Cross Fire, Williams, 12/56, game #181, CrossFire Deluxe with match also available.
  • Crusader, Williams, 9/59, game #222, a gun game that hits balls which completes bingo-like patterns,
  • Dale Gun (Mauser), Dale Engineering, 12/47.
  • Davy Crockett, Genco, 10/56.
  • Defender Machine Gun, Chicago Coin, 1971, solidstate sound.
  • Defender, Bally, 6/40, a light ray style gun game.
  • Deluxe Shooting Gallery, Midway, 3/61, shoots real 11/16" plastic balls using shoots real balls using a compressor/vacuum system, nearly the same game as Shooting Gallery (9/60), and Bally's Sharp Shooter (1/61) and Marksman (5/61).
  • Derby (Bally Derby), Bally, 2/60, five players, a bouncing ball game which players shots a gun to advance the mechanical horses to the finish line.
  • Desert Gun, Dale Engineering, early 1950s (exact date unknown).
  • Desert Gun, Midway, 1977, solidstate, 23" monitor, exactly the same as Midway's Road Runner.
  • Desert Hunter, Dale Engineering, late 1950s (exact date unknown), based on the gun game Cops & Robbers.
  • Dog Fight, Midway, 9/68, motorized score reels.
  • Duck Hunt, Sega, 1/69
  • Duck Hunt, Midway, 1974, light gun and electronic sound.
  • Electric Defense Gun, Automatic Games, 1930s (exact date unknown).
  • Electric Eye, Exhibit Supply, 1936.
  • Electric Rifle, Wm. Gent Manufacturing Company, 1920s (exact date unknown), in 1895 the Automatic Target Machine Company made one of the most interesting, inventive coin-op machines ever made. The object was to shoot a rifle at a bull's eye target. The neat thing about this game was that when you fired the electric rifle, the bullet hole appeared on the target! In the 1920's, William Gent, an arcade operator and game reseller, revamped the machine calling it Electric Rifle. He added a wood cabinet where before there was a cast iron lollipop shaped stand for the target. In Gent's Electric Rifle there were airplanes that if hit would spin its propeller, ducks that would quack when hit, and other interesting targets.
  • "500" Shooting Gallery, Exhibit Supply, 3/55, Five Hundred Shooting Gallery.
  • FBI Shoot Out Gun, Kasco, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Flotilla, Williams, 12/70, game #398, a bomber style gun game.
  • Flying Carpet, Midway, 4/70, game #542, gun game with an India theme, 8-track tape player sound only.
  • Flying Ducks, Chicago Coin, 1973.
  • Flying Saucer, Midway, 9/67.
  • Flying Saucer, Midway, 1994, redemption game.
  • Foreign Legion Twin Machine Guns, Chicago Coin, about 1971, Backglass has a French legionaire with gun to Arab's head, 2 player, twin machine gun shaped guns.
  • Fox Hunt, Sega, 1970s (exact date unknown), twin guns.
  • Funland Rifle, Chicago Coin, 1974, optional 8-track tape player.
  • GangBusters, All-Tech Industries, early 1960s.
  • GangBusters, Midway, 1974, Gang Busters has electronic sound and 8-track sound.
  • Green Beret, Chicago Coin, 1966 or 1967, nearly identical to CCM's Super Scope.
  • Gun Club, Genco, 1/58.
  • Gun Fight, Sega, 8/70, manikin gun fighters have a shoot out, Sega Gunfight has electronic sound.
  • Gun Patrol, Dale Engineering, 3/51, one of the three tall Exhibit Supply gun games (Six Shooter and Jet Gun are the other two).
  • Gun-Slinger, Electrotechnics (U.K.), 1983, Gun Slinger is an updated version of the 1960s Taylor Mr. Top Gun.
  • Gun Smoke, Bally, 4/59, Gunsmoke targets shoot back at player.
  • Gun Smoke, Kasco, 1970s (exact date unknown). Gunsmoke.
  • Haunted House, Midway, 1/72, game #553, gun game with monsters, blacklight lighting, 8-track player sound loop, uses a special 4-channel 8-track player (ne track is used for background "spooky" sounds, and three other tracks have sound effects for specific targets - the ghost, the cat and the witch).
  • Hercules, Williams, 6/59, game #216, a ball popping gun game.
  • Hit the Siamese Rats, Harold W. Thompson, 1944, based on the 1939 Seeburg Chicken Sam game, (a two-part target unit and pedestal, light activation gun game known as the Ray-o-lite G-1 gun). This game uses a two-faced (siamese) manikin with Hitler and Tojo as the gun's target.
  • Hunt Club, Chicago Coin, 7/76, two piece light activiated gun game with saparte gun stand and target stand,
  • Indian Scout, All-Tech Industries (Florida), 1961, a gun game where the player sits on a moving horse and tries to hit a buffalo or a target (alternates) which moves across a remote target stand.
  • Invaders, Midway, 12/70, game #546, a monster style gun game where the player shoots monsters with a joystick control, electronic sound.
  • Invader 3Dimension, Genco, 10/53.
  • Jail Bird, Seeburg, 1940, light activated gun game, probably the first conversion of the original 1939 Seeburg Chicken Sam gun game.
  • Jet Gun, Exhibit Supply, 1/52, one of the three tall Exhibit Supply gun games (Gun Patrol and Six Shooter are the other two).
  • Jungle Fighter, Dale Engineering, 12/47.
  • Jungle Drums, Williams, 11/71, game #405, electronic sound.
  • Jungle Gun (Deluxe Jungle Gun), United, 7/54.
  • Jungle Hunt, Exhibit Supply, 3/30, moving target and 10 shots.
  • Jungle Hunt, Exhibit Supply, 10/56, unusual cabinet design.
  • Jungle Joe, Exidy, 11/49, a pistol ray gun and wall mounted target unit.
  • Kill the Jap, Seeburg, 1942, a WW2 conversion game of the light activiation rifle game Chicken Sam (Seeburg 1939).
  • Knock Out, Allied Leisure, 1974, two players, twin guns, no moving parts, solidstate game, probably one of the first solidstate gun games.
  • Long Range Bulls Eye Gallery rifle range, Chicago Coin, 12/61.
  • Majestic Moving Target, Gottlieb, 8/29, an A.B.T. style gun game with motorized moving targets.
  • Marksman, Bally, 5/61, shoots real 11/16" plastic balls using a vacuum/compressor system, nearly the same game as the Midway Shooting Gallery (9/60) and Deluxe Shooting Gallery (3/61), and Bally's Sharp Shooter (1/61).
  • MatchLock, Sega, 1972.
  • Midnight Marauders, Bally, 1984, a mechanical gun game that uses Bally's MPU-35 pinball solidstate board system.
  • Monkey Shines, maker unknown (probably Seeburg), 1949, has a moving monkey which swings back and forth which the player shots from a remote gun stand, Ray-O-Lite pistol style gun game.
  • Monster Gun, Midway, 1967, shoot at the monsters that are circling inside the machine, Frankenstein, and various ghouls and gobblins.
  • Monster Gun, Sega, 1972, shoots plastic balls using a vacuum system, much like the Midway Shooting Gallery (9/60) and Deluxe Shooting Gallery (3/61), and the Bally Sharpshooter (1/61) and Marksman (5/61).
  • Moon Raider, Bally, 7/59.
  • Moving Target Rifle Gallery, Genco, 6/54.
  • Mr. Quick Draw, Dynamic Amusement Devices (N. Hollywood, CA), 1961, full size (six foot) gunfighter that the player has a shootout with. Manikin's right arm draws up to shoot, small mohawk loop dual head audio tape with good sound. Much like Mr. Top Gun (mid-1960s, Taylor Engineering) and Shootout at Rock Gulch.
  • Mr. Top Gun, Taylor Manufacturing Company, mid-1960s (exact date unknown), had a player holster with a six-shoter gun facing a full sized manikin gunfighter. A tape played the gunfighters voice as it would entice the player into a fight. When Mr. Top Gun's eyes flashed it was time to draw. If you shot him in the chest with the light beam pistol before he shot you, the player won. Much like Shoot-out at Rock Gulch and Dynamic Mr. QuickDraw.
  • Night Bomber, Success Mfg (Chicago), 1/41.
  • Night Bomber, Chicago Coin, 1/71, electronic sound.
  • Night Fighter 3Dimension, Genco, 9/53.
  • Ninja Gun, Kasco, year unknown, mechanical gun game, shoot the ninjas jumping out and climbing up and down the walls and rocks.
  • One Million B.C., Midway, 2/68, motorized score reels, 1 Million BC has electronic sounds.
  • Periscope, Sega, 3/68
  • Phantom Gun, Williams, 8/69, game #375, electronic sound.
  • Pirate Gun, United, 11/56.
  • Pistol (aka Pistol Champ), Chicago Coin, 1947, shoot four animal targets, 15 shots for 5 cents, "bubble head" cabinet similar to Chicago Coin's Basketball Champ.
  • Playland Rifle Gallery, Chicago Coin, 8/59.
  • Plinker's Canyon, Sega, 1970s (exact date unknown).
  • Polar Hunt, Williams, 3/55, game #124.
  • Pom-Pom Gun, Dale Engineering, 1930s (exact date unknown), big weird aluminum raygun on a pivot base that you look in and shoot.
  • Pop-Gun Circus, Exhibit Supply, 8/57.
  • Pony Express, Chicago Coin, 6/60.
  • Pussy Shooter, Hayden Manufacturing, 1930, made in England, knock down all the cats with 5 balls and your 1 cent is returned.
  • Ranger, Keeney, 3/55.
  • Rapid Fire, Bally, 6/40, ray gun type similar to Seeburg's Chicken Sam (1939), shoot at U-boats.
  • Rapid Fire, Allied Leisure, 1972.
  • Ray Gun, Chicago Coin, 2/61, much like the 1930s and 1940s Seeburg light gun games 1939 Chicken Sam and 1947 Shoot the Bear with a separate gun stand and a cord connecting the gun and the target cabinet.
  • Ray-O-Lite Rifle, Seeburg, 1/36, a duck shoot game, this rayolite game is one of the first light activated gun games.
  • Rifle Champ, Midway, 12/64, timed game with unlimited shots.
  • Rifle Gallery, Chicago Coin, date unknown (probably mid 1970s).
  • Rifle Gallery, Genco, 6/54.
  • Rifle Gallery, Midway, 1961, shoots 11/16" nylon pellets with a vacuum system.
  • Rifle Range, Midway, 6/63.
  • Rifle Range, Seeburg, 1950.
  • Rifle Sport, A.B.T., 1960s (exact date unknown), 3 or 6 air gun rifle range with automatic rifles shooting moving targets, Air-O-Matic gun powered by compressed air, 3/16" shots can be reused, fully automatic, accurate up to 35 feet.
  • Rifleman, Sega, 1967, after finishing ten shots for ten cents, it prints out a card that is extracted on the right side of the cabinet. This card is a print of where your shots landed in relation to the bullseye targets. The cards are in roll form.
  • Riot Gun, Chicago Coin, 9/63.
  • Road Runner, Midway, 1977, solidstate, 23" monitor, exactly the same as Midway's Desert Gun.
  • Rocket Rifle Range, Chicago Coin, 2/62, CCM/CDI, same game as Champion Rifle Range. Shoot a pinball off a metal rack, and it drops onto a pinball playfield. Shoot the pop bumpers to increase their value.
  • Rodeo Shooting Galley, Chicago Coin, 1972, electronic sound, 8-track tape player background sound.
  • Safari, Chicago Coin, 6/69, 8-track tape player.
  • Safari, Sega (SegaSA), 1970s (exact date unknown), twin guns.
  • Safari Gun, Williams, 12/54, game #122.
  • Safari Gun Deluxe, Williams, 5/55, game #121.
  • School Days, Rockola, 1/37, light beam gun with separate gun stand.
  • SharpShooter, Bally, 1/61, Sharp Shooter shoots real 11/16" plastic balls using a vacuum/compressor system, nearly the same game as the Midway Shooting Gallery (9/60) and Deluxe Shooting Gallery (3/61), and the later Bally Marksman (5/61).
  • Sharp Shooter, Chicago Coin, 5/71, electronic sound.
  • Shoot Out, Chicago Coin, 3/76, released at the same time as CCM's Coney Island gun game, 8-track tape player.
  • Shootamatic, International Mutoscope, 7/34, shoot targets to drop prizes into the hopper.
  • Shoot the Bartender, International Mutoscope, 1939.
  • Shoot the Bear, Seeburg, 1947, a light gun rayolite style game with a target cabinet and a separate gun cabinet.
  • Shoot the Chutes, Seeburg, 6/40, a Rayolite gun game, a WW2 revamp of the 1939 Seeburg Chicken Sam.
  • Shoot the Clown, Chicago Coin, 2/60.
  • Shoot the Rabbit, Seeburg, late 1940s (exact date unknown), a conversion of the 1947 Seeburg Shoot the Bear.
  • Shooting Gallery, Exhibit Supply, 5/54
  • Shooting Gallery, Midway, 9/60, shoots real 11/16" plastic balls using shoots real balls using a compressor/vacuum system, nearly the same game as Deluxe Shooting Gallery (3/61), and Bally's Sharp Shooter (1/61) and Marksman (5/61).
  • Shoot-Out at Rock Gulch, Taylor Manufacturing Company, mid-1960s (exact date unknown), Shoot Out at Rock Gulch had a player holster with a six-shoter gun facing a full sized manikin gunfighter. A tape played the gunfighters voice as it would entice the player into a fight. When the manikin's eyes flashed it was time to draw. If you shot him in the chest with the light beam pistol before he shot you, the player won. Much like Mr. Top Gun.
  • Shoot Dem Bones, Alfred Crompton (U.K.), 1960s (exact date unknown), a small foot print gun game with a Halloween theme.
  • Shooting Trainer, Nintendo, 1974, projection gun game like Nintendo's Wild Gunman and Sky Hawk.
  • Shoot Your Way to Tokyo, Supreme, 1942, a revamp of Air Raider (1940), big sized projection screen gun game with an impressive 1930s machine gun.
  • Silver Bullets, Exhibit Supply, 10/49, dual .45 caliber handguns, made by Exhibit under license from Dale Engineering.
  • Silver Dollar, A.B.T., year unknown.
  • Six Shooter, Dale Engineering, 10/50, one of the three tall Exhibit Supply gun games (Gun Patrol and Jet Gun are the other two).
  • Skill Thrill, Daval, 1941.
  • Skill Pistol Range, Fey, 1920s (exact date unknown), player shots his penny at one of three target holes. If successful, a payout is received.
  • Sky Battle, Chicago Coin, 10/71.
  • Sky Battle, Bally, 6/40, light activated ray gun style.
  • Sky Fighter, International Mutoscope, 3/40.
  • Sky Fighter-II, Taito, 1970s (exact date unknown), Sky Fighter 2.
  • Sky Gunner, Genco, 7/53.
  • Sky Hawk, Nintendo, 1970s exact date unknown, a project style gun game similar to Nintendo's Wild Gunman and Shooting Trainer.
  • Sky Pilot, the Baker Company, 1940.
  • Sky Raider, United, 10/58, unique cabinet, twin guns but single player.
  • Sky Rocket, Genco, 5/55, two players take turns at shooting.
  • Sniper, Williams, 3/71, game #399, electronic sound.
  • Space Age Gun, Genco, 6/58.
  • Space Ace, Sega, date unknown.
  • Space Glider, Williams, 11/60, game #243, a gun game that pops rubber balls into the air completing bingo style patterns.
  • Space Gun, Exhibit Supply, 1/53.
  • Space Gun, Midway, 1964, fourteen targets: two are stationary bonus targets, four rotating 90 degree targets, eight on a turntable with '2 balls' that pop up when hit.
  • Space Gunner, Bally, 5/58, no trigger to pull, plastic balls are automatically feed and shot from the gun at faster than one ball per second, does not use air to shot balls.
  • Space Invader, Exhibit Supply, 1950s (exact date unknown), gun game.
  • Spook Gun, Bally, 9/58, kiddie size.
  • Spooks, Williams, 2/69, game #365, electronic sound, black light.
  • Sportland, Keeney, 11/51.
  • Sportland Shooting Gallery, Exhibit Supply, 11/54.
  • Sportsman, Midway, 1970s (exact date unknown), electronic sound,
  • Sportsman Deluxe, Keeney, 12/54.
  • State Fair Rifle Gallery, Genco, 8/56.
  • Star Shooting Gallery, Exhibit Supply, 8/54.
  • Stockade, Williams, 7/72, game #395, electronic sound.
  • Submarine, Keeney, 11/41, shot metal balls at the sub.
  • Super Big Top Rifle Gallery, Genco, 12/55.
  • Super Circus Rifle Gallery, Chicago Coin, 12/69, electronic sound with 8-track player.
  • Super Scope Rifle, Chicago Coin, 1966 or 1967, nearly identical to CCM's Green Beret.
  • Target Gun, Exhibit Supply, 4/49.
  • Target Master, Automatic Devices Inc./Falcon Industries, 12/47, used a 45 caliber semi-auto hand gun replica, smallest ray (light) gun game ever made.
  • Target Skill, A.B.T. Manufacturing Corp., 1928 to 1961, a countertop trade stimulator gun game.
  • Targette, Keeney, 11/36, light activated gun game.
  • Targets, Bally, 10/59.
  • Target Master, Automatic Devices Inc, 1949.
  • Target Master, Falcon Industries, 1948.
  • Texas Ranger Gatling Gun, Chicago Coin, 1963, huge machine type gun and unique cabinet.
  • Titan, Williams, 11/59, game #225, a gun game that pops rubber balls into the air completing bingo style patterns.
  • Tommy Gun, Evans, 1/41, very unique looking.
  • Top Gun, Taylor Engineering (California), mid 1960s (exact date unknown), player tries to out-draw a six foot manikin gun fighter, much like Mr. Quick Draw (1961, Dynamic Amusement Devices).
  • Top Gun, Midway, 1976, western themed shoot-out game with six surprise targets.
  • Torpedo, Bally, 6/40, shoot balls at U-boat.
  • Tracer, Sega, 1970s (exact date unknown), twin guns.
  • Trap Shoot, Chicago Coin, 4/73, dual console gun game with a double-barrel style shotgun, light activate targets.
  • Treasure Cove Rifle Gallery, Exhibit Supply, 7/55.
  • Trophy Gun, Midway, 6/64.
  • Twin Pirate Gun, Midway, 1974, two players and two guns, 8-track sound, light activated targets.
  • Twin Rifle, Chicago Coin, 1971, two players and two rifles, 8-track tape player.
  • Twin Skeet Shoot, Chicago Coin, 1974, twin guns, 2 players, 8-track tape player.
  • Two Gun Fun, Keeney, 11/61, two players and two pistols.
  • U-Boat, MCI (Milwaukee Coin Industries), 1972, Uboat is a submarine gun game similar to Midway's Sea Raiders (1969).
  • U.S. Marshall, A.B.T., 1950s (exact date unknown), a standup A.B.T. style gun game, Game, Game.
  • Vanguard, Williams, 5/59, game #213, a gun game that pops rubber balls into the air completing bingo style patterns.
  • Western Gun, Exhibit Supply, 7/53.
  • White Lightning, Midway, 9/70, game #541, a gun game that shoots nylon plastic balls using a compressor/vacuum system, and hits physical rotating targets, NO electronic sound (unlike other gun games from Midway in this era).
  • Wild Gunman, Nintendo, 1974, gunfighters are projected on to a screen, when the gunfighers eyes flash, the player draws. Similar to Nintendo's Shooting Trainer and Sky Hawk. By Gunpei Yokoi who was also responsible for the Game Boy, color Game Boy, Virtual Boy, Donkey Kong. etc.
  • Wild Kingdom, Midway, 6/71, game #549, gun game with wild animal theme and 8-track player sound.
  • Wild West Gallery, Genco, 2/55.
  • Wild West, Chicago Coin, 5/61, Indian moves back and forth in score box, two piece light ray gun (light activated) and gun stand and target stand, gun attached to gun stand and can not be removed, CCM's last two-piece gun game. Similar to CCM's Ray Gun (2/61).
  • Wild West Rifle, Chicago Coin, 1967.
  • Wild West, Genco, 2/55, two players take turns at shooting. Has a new Criss Cross match feature making it Criss Cross Wild West.
  • World's Fair Rifle Gallery, Chicago Coin, 7/62.

Pictures, flyers and info thanks to Mike Pacak, B.Bolman, J.Stahlecker, L.Bieza, B.Kurtz, Jukebox Eddie, Mike Munves catalogs, and many others.


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